Tag Archives: climate

Keystone XL Controversy: Investigation Reveals Scientific Misconduct, Abuse of Whistleblowers

8 Aug

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Scientists Punished for Objecting to
Downplaying of Pipeline Impact to Endangered Species

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by the Center for Biological Diversity

WASHINGTON— Yet another scandal surrounding the Keystone XL pipeline surfaced today: Media are reporting that an investigation by the Interior Department’s inspector general has found that agency scientists were improperly retaliated against after blowing the whistle on flaws with a map of American burying beetle habitat along the pipeline’s southern route.    Continue reading

Twenty-seven Years of Pipeline Spills: What’s Not to Love

1 Aug

from Center for Biological Diversity

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As the U.S. Senate considers another Keystone vote, a new study released today reveals a deeply troubling history of pipeline accidents in the United States. An independent analysis of federal records has found that since 1986, oil and gas pipeline leaks, spills and other incidents have resulted in nearly $7 billion in damages, more than 2,000 injuries, and more than 500 deaths.

A new time-lapse video documents every “significant pipeline” incident in the continental United States — along with their human and financial costs — from 1986 to 2012. On average one significant pipeline incident occurs in the country every 30 hours, according to the data.     Continue reading

Regaining Food Sovereignty: Neyaab Nimamoomin Mewinzha Gaa-inajigeyang

27 Jun

by John Ahni Schertow / Intercontinental Cry

Regaining Food Sovereignty explores the state of food systems in some Northern Minnesota Native communities; examining the relationship between history, health, tradition, culture and food. By reclaiming and revitalizing knowledge and practices around tradition, local and healthy foods, many communities and Tribal Nations are working toward a new model of community health and well-being for this and future generations.

Regaining Food Sovereignty is a co-production of Lakeland Public Television & The Indigenous Environmental Network.

Navajos Launch Direct Action Against Big Coal

27 Jun

by Sarah Lazare / Common Dreams

Photo by Black Mesa Water Coalition

Photo by Black Mesa Water Coalition

 

Navajo Nation members launched a creative direct action Tuesday to protest the massive coal-fueled power plant that cuts through their Scottsdale, Arizona land.

After a winding march, approximately 60 demonstrators used a massive solar-powered truck to pump water from the critical Central Arizona Project (CAP) canal into barrels for delivery to the reservation.

Flanked by supporters from across the United States, tribe members created a living example of what a Navajo-led transition away from coal toward solar power in the region could look like.   Continue reading

Tar Sands Mining Beginning in Utah

20 Jun

Why the U.S. Is Becoming Ground Zero For the Dirtiest Energy

alberta-tar-sandsby Tara Lohan / Alternet

The practice that has devastated parts of Canada is already underway in the U.S. and things could get a lot worse.

Continue reading

Monsanto Says Opponents May be to Blame for GMO Wheat Escape

10 Jun

by John Upton / Grist

monsanto-wheat-280x250A week after word got out that unapproved GMO wheat was found growing on an Oregon farm, Monsanto has announced the results of an internal investigation into the mysterious outbreak. The results can be summarized thusly: “Nothing is wrong at our end and everybody’s crops are safe. Maybe our opponents planted our freak wheat to try to hurt us.”    Continue reading

Wolves Lose Protection in Northeast Under Proposed US Rule

8 Jun

by AP

This 2008 photo released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a gray wolf. The Obama administration on Friday, June 7, 2013 proposed lifting most of the remaining federal protections for gray wolves across the mainland states, a move that would end four decades of recovery efforts but has been criticized by some scientists as premature. Photo courtesy of USFWS

This 2008 photo released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a gray wolf. The Obama administration on Friday, June 7, 2013 proposed lifting most of the remaining federal protections for gray wolves across the mainland states, a move that would end four decades of recovery efforts but has been criticized by some scientists as premature. Photo courtesy of USFWS

Wolves that wander into Upstate New York or northern New England from Canada or elsewhere would lose federal protection after most of the animal’s species are removed from the federal endangered species list, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed Friday.

Wolves, which have been persecuted to near-extermination, have rebounded, the Fish and Wildlife Service said.

There are no breeding populations of wolves in the Northeast, but there are populations of wolves in Canada not far from the U.S. and wolves from other regions are occasionally found in the region, said Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Specialist Mark McCollough, based in Orono, Maine. Eventually, they will no longer have federal protection, he said.

“They will no longer be protected under the federal act, but the states will be responsible for managing wolves,” he said.

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