Tag Archives: science

Lawsuit Launched to Protect Endangered Species From Fracking in Michigan

5 Sep

Risky Oil and Gas Production Threatens Rare Butterflies, Bats in Allegan State Game Area

by the Center for Biological Diversity

fracking-in-michiganGRAND RAPIDS, Mich.— The Center for Biological Diversity launched federal litigation today challenging the Bureau of Land Management for failing to protect endangered species like the Karner blue butterfly and Indiana bat by properly assessing the risks posed to them by fracking on public land being leased for oil and gas production in a game reserve in southwestern Michigan.

On Sept. 12 the federal government plans to auction off more than 27,000 acres of publicly owned mineral rights in the Allegan State Game Reserve but has not analyzed the harm fracking and drilling could do to all the area’s rare and protected species.   Continue reading

Report: Toxic Fracking Fluids Killed Rare Fish in Kentucky

29 Aug

by the Center for Biological Diversity

Blackside dace photo by Richard G. Biggins, USFWS.

Blackside dace photo by Richard G. Biggins, USFWS.

LEXINGTON, Ky.— A federally protected fish called the blackside dace was among numerous fish killed in Kentucky’s Acorn Fork creek by a small spill of hydraulic fracking fluid that caused the fish to develop liver and spleen damage and gill lesions, according to a federal study released this week. The report documenting the 2007 incident, which comes a month after reports that a natural gas company repeatedly dumped polluted fracking water directly into the Big Sandy River, highlights the threat to wildlife and water quality posed by even small amounts of the toxic chemicals used to extract natural gas from fracking wells.

“These two sickening incidents in Kentucky make clear the growing threat that fracking poses to endangered species, public health and drinking water supplies across much of the country,” said Tierra Curry, a scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity.  Continue reading

Twenty-seven Years of Pipeline Spills: What’s Not to Love

1 Aug

from Center for Biological Diversity

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As the U.S. Senate considers another Keystone vote, a new study released today reveals a deeply troubling history of pipeline accidents in the United States. An independent analysis of federal records has found that since 1986, oil and gas pipeline leaks, spills and other incidents have resulted in nearly $7 billion in damages, more than 2,000 injuries, and more than 500 deaths.

A new time-lapse video documents every “significant pipeline” incident in the continental United States — along with their human and financial costs — from 1986 to 2012. On average one significant pipeline incident occurs in the country every 30 hours, according to the data.     Continue reading

Domestic Eco-Terrorism Has Deep Pockets, Including Moms that Love Ecotage

27 Jul

from Earth First! Newsgmo-genetically-modified-organism_50290d5e92a11

According to a recent article in Forbes, environmental saboteurs in the U.S. receive broad popular support as well as financial resources from the organic foods industry.

The article’s authors Jay Byme, a corporate public relations expert and former U.S. AID senior official, and Henry I. Miller, founding director of the FDA’s Office of Biotechnology, claim that groups like Moms against Monsanto, Earth First!, GreenPeace, Stonyfield Organic and New York Time’s food writer Mark Bittman form a synergistic and terroristic anti-GMO food movement with the ultimate goal being “to sell more overpriced, overrated organic food.”  Continue reading

Regaining Food Sovereignty: Neyaab Nimamoomin Mewinzha Gaa-inajigeyang

27 Jun

by John Ahni Schertow / Intercontinental Cry

Regaining Food Sovereignty explores the state of food systems in some Northern Minnesota Native communities; examining the relationship between history, health, tradition, culture and food. By reclaiming and revitalizing knowledge and practices around tradition, local and healthy foods, many communities and Tribal Nations are working toward a new model of community health and well-being for this and future generations.

Regaining Food Sovereignty is a co-production of Lakeland Public Television & The Indigenous Environmental Network.

Navajos Launch Direct Action Against Big Coal

27 Jun

by Sarah Lazare / Common Dreams

Photo by Black Mesa Water Coalition

Photo by Black Mesa Water Coalition

 

Navajo Nation members launched a creative direct action Tuesday to protest the massive coal-fueled power plant that cuts through their Scottsdale, Arizona land.

After a winding march, approximately 60 demonstrators used a massive solar-powered truck to pump water from the critical Central Arizona Project (CAP) canal into barrels for delivery to the reservation.

Flanked by supporters from across the United States, tribe members created a living example of what a Navajo-led transition away from coal toward solar power in the region could look like.   Continue reading

Wolves Lose Protection in Northeast Under Proposed US Rule

8 Jun

by AP

This 2008 photo released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a gray wolf. The Obama administration on Friday, June 7, 2013 proposed lifting most of the remaining federal protections for gray wolves across the mainland states, a move that would end four decades of recovery efforts but has been criticized by some scientists as premature. Photo courtesy of USFWS

This 2008 photo released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows a gray wolf. The Obama administration on Friday, June 7, 2013 proposed lifting most of the remaining federal protections for gray wolves across the mainland states, a move that would end four decades of recovery efforts but has been criticized by some scientists as premature. Photo courtesy of USFWS

Wolves that wander into Upstate New York or northern New England from Canada or elsewhere would lose federal protection after most of the animal’s species are removed from the federal endangered species list, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposed Friday.

Wolves, which have been persecuted to near-extermination, have rebounded, the Fish and Wildlife Service said.

There are no breeding populations of wolves in the Northeast, but there are populations of wolves in Canada not far from the U.S. and wolves from other regions are occasionally found in the region, said Fish and Wildlife Service Endangered Species Specialist Mark McCollough, based in Orono, Maine. Eventually, they will no longer have federal protection, he said.

“They will no longer be protected under the federal act, but the states will be responsible for managing wolves,” he said.

Continue reading

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