50,000 Mink Liberated in Greece, and more…

30 Aug

From Bite Back:

Greek media has reported that as many as 50,000 mink were released from cages. In an article in the Makedonia newspaper, the president of a Greek fur breeders association said that it was a “black day” for the industry. The owner of one of the targeted farms estimated his losses at 1 million Euros and said that his farm had been ruined. See the anonymous communique below.


anonymous communique (photo: newsit.gr):

“26.08.2010 – Heliodendro, Kastoria (Greece)
One of the biggest greek mink farms has been hit in our first night of action. All the cages imprisoning animals in 37 sheds of the farm were opened and machinery sabotaged. To let the animals out part of the fence was cut and both gates opened smashing the locks (using the farmer’s tools). Two hours and half of work and we could run away along with thousands of minks (according to media 50.000 were released).

27.08.2010 – Kaloneri, Siatista (Greece)
Another mink farm was our target for a second night of action, this time near the town of Kaloneri, on a road where 10 farms can be easily seen. 8 sheds full of animals had their cages opened in just ten minutes. Before leaving we opened a gate to let the animals run towards freedom (according to media 2.000 were released).

In both cases we had checked carefully the farms to know how to organize a faster and more secure action. With these actions we decided to hit the fur industry and especially the disgusting ‘fur towns’ of Siatista and Kastoria, plagued with hundreds of fur stores. Liberating animals from cages is a way to put our ideas into practice. We oppose the oppression, exploitation and imprisonment that this civilization has created for any living being, regardless of species, race, gender or sexual preferences.

In these desperate days we still strive for freedom. Eat vegan on the barricades!

A.L.F.”

In further animal news, the American Bird Conservancy (ABC), the nation’s leading bird conservation organization, in cooperation with the Amazon Conservation Association (ACA), has helped finance the purchase 7,427 acres of world-class bird and wildlife habitat in southern Peru that may contain the highest bird diversity for a single site in the world.

On the political front, conservation groups expressed dismay today after a decision by the Environmental Protection Agency to deny a petition to ban toxic lead bullets and shot that commonly kill and harm bald eagles, trumpeter swans, endangered California condors and other wildlife. An estimated 10 million to 20 million birds and other animals die each year from lead poisoning in the United States.

In other news, 100 protesters marched down the streets of San Francisco to commemorate Hurricane Katrina and call for an end to fossil fuels. Organized by the Mobilization for Climate Justice, the protest began with a die-in outside of a Chevron office, briefly blocking the entrance to the headquarters of Chevron Energy Solutions, before marching to the EPA office and demanding real solutions to climate change. The march was harried by 6 motorcycle cops attempting to force the marchers on to the sidewalk, but police eventually realized the futility of their efforts and agreed to non-violently “escort” the peaceful marchers to the EPA.

Check out the Katrina Action Network to see their corporate accountability campaign, 27 Days of Action: Remembering Katrina and Rita (August 29 -September 24).

2 Responses to “50,000 Mink Liberated in Greece, and more…”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Could Golden Dawn Bring a New Wave of Eco-Fascism from Greece to the US? | Earth First! Newswire - June 6, 2013

    […] in the furriers’ union, which is ironic, as today the ALF in Greece claim title to the largest fur farm raids in the history of animal liberation (good for the mink, not so great for the native bird populations.) But to the film’s […]

  2. Neo-nazis posturing as eco-warriors | Diasporic Mutual Aid - June 6, 2013

    […] in the furriers’ union, which is ironic, as today the ALF in Greece claim title to the largest fur farm raids in the history of animal liberation (good for the mink, not so great for the native bird populations.) To the film’s credit, it also […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: