Archive by Author

“Death Sentence” for Raccoons, Other Orphaned Wildlife

5 Sep
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Photo: Washington Post

By Jay Reeves / AP

Wildlife lovers are protesting a new state rule in Alabama they say is a death sentence for helpless baby raccoons, skunks and other wild animals there.The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources said Thursday that it will no longer issue permits for the rehabilitation of certain orphaned or injured raccoons, skunks, opossums, foxes, coyotes, feral pigs or bats.

Anyone who finds an orphaned or hurt animal should leave it in the wild, the agency said, and humane organizations should euthanize any of the animals they receive.

“Basically there is no biological reason to rehabilitate these animals,” said biologist Ray Metzler, assistant chief of wildlife for the agency. Continue reading

Greenpeace Protesters ‘Frack’ Lancashire Council Hall

5 Sep

Fracking protest in Lancashire

By  / theguardian.com

Around 10 protesters from Greenpeace have erected a mock drilling rig outside Lancashire council’s county hall in Preston, to protest at plans byenergy company Cuadrilla to resume fracking in the county this autumn.

The action follows a similar stunt by the green group in March, when itset up a rig in the Cheshire constituency of the chancellor, George Osborne, who has been one of the most vocal backers of fracking for shale gas

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Protests Continue in Bucharest Against Goldmine Plan in Rosia Montana

5 Sep

By Grace Wong / The Guardian

Romanians protesting in capital Bucharest

Romanians protest in capital Bucharest against the government’s support for a plan to open Europe’s biggest opencast goldmine in Rosia Montana. Photograph: Cristian Vasile / Save Rosia Montana Campaign

About 1,000 people gathered in Bucharest on Tuesday night for a third day of protests against plans for Europe‘s biggest opencast goldmine.

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Naomi Klein: Green Groups May Be More Damaging Than Climate Change Deniers

5 Sep
Photo Cred: Ed Kashi

Photo Cred: Ed Kashi

By Jason Mark / Earth Island Journal.

Canadian author Naomi Klein is so well known for her blade-sharp commentary that it’s easy to forget that she is, above all, a first-rate reporter. I got a glimpse into her priorities as I was working on this interview. Klein told me she was worried that some of the things she had said would make it hard for her to land an interview with a president of the one of the Big Green groups (read below and you’ll see why). She was more interested in nabbing the story than being the story; her reporting trumped any opinion-making.

During your career you’ve written about the power of brand names, populist movements around the world, and free market fundamentalism. Why now a book and film on climate change?

You know, The Shock Doctrine, my last book, ends with climate change. It ends with a vision of a dystopic future where you have weak infrastructure colliding with heavy weather, as we saw with Hurricane Katrina. And rather than working to prevent future disasters by having lower emissions, you have all these attempts to take advantage of that crisis. At the time, it seemed to me that climate change was potentially going to be the biggest disaster-capitalism free-for-all that we’ve seen yet. So it was quite a logical progression for me to go from writing about disaster-capitalism in The Shock Doctrine to writing about climate change. As I was writing The Shock Doctrine, I was covering the Iraq War and profiteering from the war, and I started to see these patterns repeat in the aftermath of natural disasters, like the Asian tsunami and then Hurricane Katrina. There are chapters in that book on both of those events. Then I came to the idea that climate change could be a kind of a “people’s shock,” an answer to the shock doctrine – not just another opportunity by the disaster capitalists to feed off of misery, but an opportunity for progressive forces to deepen democracy and really improve livelihoods around the world. Then I came across the idea of “climate debt” when I was doing a piece on reparations for Harper’s magazine. I had a meeting with Bolivia’s climate negotiator in Geneva – her name is Angélica Navarro – and she put the case to me that climate change could be an opportunity for a global Green Marshall Plan with the North paying climate debts in the form of huge green development project.

Obama’s Central Asian Gambit

5 Sep

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The New Great Game Surges Forward

By Sasha / Earth First! News

The NATO draw-down in Afghanistan and pending US strikes against Syria have Russia concerned that its border relations with Central Asia will soon be threatened. With the genuine concern coming from the Left that an attack on Syria would lure Iran into a war, there has been less focus on Iran’s Central Asian neighbors, which are increasingly becoming pawns in a resource scramble between Russia, the US, and China. Enter the New Great Game.

Russia started voicing its concern about US intervention in Syria last year, and recently reinforced its positions in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan with military agreements to the tune of more than a billion dollars. Russia’s 700 soldiers based in Kyrgyzstan and 7,000 soldiers in Tajikistan provide an intimidating presence in the region to say the least. Upon returning from the BRICS summit in Durbin this March, as EU-friendly rebels ousted the BRICS-leaning government of François Bozizé in the Central African Republic, Putin ordered military exercises on the Black Sea involving precisely 7,000 troops (along with 20 jets, and 50 pieces of artillery). The maneuvers put to rest questions of Russian battle readiness and capacity to act in the Mediterranean. The gesture was noteworthy: Syria would not be the next Libya; Central Asia would not be the next Central African Republic.

Putin overseas snap military excercise

Putin oversees snap military excercise

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‘Private militia’ firm ordered to close over Guarani killings

4 Sep

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Cross Posted from Survival International

Brazil’s Public Prosecutors have called for the closure of a notorious security firm accused of carrying out at least eight brutal attacks on Guarani communities, and of killing at least two of their leaders.

Ranchers reportedly paid Gaspem 30,000 reais (US$ 12,700) each time it violently evicted Guarani Indians from their ancestral lands, which are now occupied by ranches and sugarcane plantations.

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Moving Beyond Keystone XL

4 Sep

Direct Action on Line 9

by David Osborn / Counterpunch

On the morning of June 20th a group of people walked onto the Canadian energy corporation Enbridge’s North Westover pumping station and occupied the facility. They called this blockade “Swamp Line 9”. The facility is part of what is called Line 9, a pipeline that moves oil west towards Sarnia and the refining facilities there. However, the industry has been engaged in an effort to slowly gain regulatory approval to reverse the pipeline, allowing it to carry tar sands oil east for refining or to the Atlantic coast for export. The pumping station for Line 9 had been shut down for work and remained shut down during the occupation as Enbridge employees were unable to access the site. The direct action effectively stopped all activity at the pumping station until June 26th when the Canadian authorities raided the occupation and arrested twenty people (you can support their legal fund here).

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Three Arrests as Maine Earth First!, 350.org Protest Oil Trains

29 Aug

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By Mark LaFlamme / Sun Journal

The way Jessie Dowling sees it, getting arrested is the very least she can do.

“We need to put our bodies on the line,” the 32-year-old Unity woman said, just before being led into a police van for the short ride to jail. “We don’t want another Lac-Megantic.”

And there, in one simple sentence, was the thrust of the event.

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Ecologists Say Fire Suppression Efforts Left Century’s Worth Of Fuel for Rim Fire

28 Aug
Rim Fire_pho_2013233_lrg

Photo by NASA

SACRAMENTO (AP) – Unnaturally long intervals between wildfires and years of drought primed the Sierra Nevada for the explosive conflagration chewing up the rugged landscape on the edge of Yosemite National Park, forestry experts say.

The fire had ravaged 282 square miles by Tuesday, the biggest in the Sierra’s recorded history and one of the largest on record in California.

Containment increased to 20 percent but the number of destroyed structures rose to 101 and some 4,500 structures remained threatened. The types of lost buildings were not specified. Firefighters were making stands at Tuolumne City and other mountain communities.

The blaze was just 40 acres when it was discovered near a road in Stanislaus National Forest on Aug. 17, but firefighters had no chance of stopping it in the early days.

Fueled by thick forest floor vegetation in steep river canyons, it exploded to 10,000 acres 36 hours later, then to 54,000 acres and 105,620 acres within the next two days. On its 11th day it had surpassed 179,400 acres, becoming the seventh-largest California wildfire in records dating to 1932.

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Megaload Ban Could Cost General Electric Millions

27 Aug

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Cross Posted from Wild Idaho Rising Tide

Today’s hearing postponed until next week; Omega Morgan won’t move any loads until September 18

A subsidiary of the General Electric Company (GE) could lose millions of dollars if megaload shipments are banned or even significantly delayed on U.S. Highway 12, according to court documents.

Resources Conservation Company International (RCCI), a subsidiary of the multinational conglomerate, has asked to intervene in a lawsuit filed by the Nez Perce Tribe and Idaho Rivers United (IRU) that seeks to compel the U.S. Forest Service to stop the shipment of megaloads across the Nez Perce-Clearwater National Forest.

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