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Coal Headquarters Shut Down By Demonstrators Locked to Tank of Dirty Water

24 May

Residents Protest Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining, Health Impacts and Sludge Expansion

5 people locked to tank of dirty 250 gal of water and a barrel blocking entrance to Alpha Natural Resources' HQ.

by Charles / RAMPS

BRISTOL, VA.— Three residents of Central Appalachia and supporters with Mountain Justice chained themselves to an industrial tank of black water in front of Alpha Natural Resources’ Bristol, Va., headquarters to protest Alpha’s mountaintop removal strip mining and coal slurry operations across the region.

“I’m risking arrest today because mountaintop removal has to end now for the future viability of Appalachia,” says Emily Gillespie of Roanoke, Va., whose work with the Mountain Justice movement is inspired by Appalachian women’s history of non-violent resistance. The tank of water represents coal contamination from affected communities across the Appalachian region.

The group called for Alpha to stop seeking an expansion of the Brushy Fork coal slurry impoundment in Raleigh County, W.Va. “We want Kevin Crutchfield, CEO of Alpha Natural Resources, to produce a signed document expressing that they won’t seek the expansion of the Brushy Fork Impoundment before we leave,” Junior Walk, 23, from the Brushy Fork area said.

“I live downstream from Alpha’s Brushy Fork coal slurry impoundment on Coal River. If that impoundment breaks, my whole family would be killed,” Walk said, Continue reading

Ranchers Against Coal? Montana Does Things Diffrunt

29 Apr

By Kim Murphy, Cross Posted from Los Angeles Times

Out in these windy stretches of cottonwood and prairie grass, not far from where Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer ran into problems at Little Bighorn, a new battle is unfolding over what future energy development in the West will look like.

Here, rancher Wallace McRae and his son, Clint, run cattle on 31,000 acres along Rosebud Creek, land their family has patrolled with horses and tamed with fences for 125 years.

They could probably go on undisturbed for 100 years more if the earth under the pastures weren’t laced with coal. A consortium led by BNSF Railway Co. wants to build a rail line to carry some of that coal to market. Nine miles of it would run through the McRae ranch.

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A Call For More Meeting Disruptions!

24 Apr

by Rabb!t / Earth First! Newswire

As the saying goes: dress for the job you want [to undermine], not the one you have [been].

Lately, environmental activists have been shedding the flannels and camo and straightening their ties in order to infiltrate meetings, conferences and symposiums, disrupting dirty energy projects at the point of decision. Not only can you stop a lot of bulldozers by interrupting the executives who order the bulldozers—you also get to see the looks on those execs’ faces as they realize that all their power and money suddenly appear insubstantial in the face of passionate cries and steel bicycle locks.

pnc-protest_original

Just yesterday, the Pittsburg Post-Gazette reported, protesters fed up with mountaintop removal coal mining crashed PNC Financial Services Group’s annual shareholder’s meeting. According to participants, PNC is one of the nation’s largest financiers of mountaintop coal mining. The activists, most of whom were from the Earth Quaker Action Team, called out the names of board members and asked them to state their position on mountaintop removal. PNC’s chairman and CEO, James Rohr, tried to continue the meeting in spite of the disturbance, but finally gave up, calling the meeting off about 15 minutes after it started.

[Update: Read George Lakey’s personal account of the action here]

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Last partner drops out of Coos Bay coal terminal project

2 Apr

Cross Posted from TDN

The last investor of a proposed Coos Bay coal terminal has dropped out, leaving three coal export terminal projects still alive on the Columbia River.

According to the Oregon International Port of Coos Bay, negotiations on a lease agreement Metropolitan Stevedore Company of Wilmington, Calif., known as Metro Ports, ended Sunday. The company and the port had first signed a tentative lease agreement in October 2011.

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Report from Shady Global Trade Talks in Singapore

16 Mar

And a call to build resistance against the TPP

Kiwis in New Zealand have been at the forefront of anti-TPP organizing, thus far.

Kiwis in New Zealand have been at the forefront of anti-TPP organizing, thus far.

Members and partners of Trans Pacific Partnership (known as TPP or TPPA) held the 16th-round of talks in Singapore last week.  As usual, the talks were shrouded in secrecy. Hundreds of trade delegates and policy makers from 11 countries, including the US, met to negotiate expanding profit-driven industrial commerce, including special agendas to smooth trade flows between member countries in the grouping.

Japanese farmers at Anti-TPP in 2012

Farmers stage a protest march during an anti-TPP rally in Tokyo, April 25, 2012. Similar rallies were held last week.

While we heard reports of farmers in Japan protesting, solidarity rallies of labor and environmental activists and a bunch of petitions sent to congresspeople, responses to the TPP negotiations thus far have been far too calm and comfortable. But it doesn’t have to stay that way…

The following article (which will be printed in the coming Earth First! Journal) is a call for renewed resistance to the expansion of corporate globalization: Continue reading

$10 Million to Injured Workers from Chevron Payout

12 Feb

A “drop in the bucket,” most of the payouts covered medical exams and treatments at hospitals for those sickened by the smoke from the Richmond, CA refinery fire.

Chevron paid approximately $10 million to cover medical expenses and other claims in the wake of the fire at its Richmond refinery on Aug. 6. Most of those payouts went to local hospitals to cover medical exams and treatment received by residents sickened by toxin-filled smoke that spread for miles after the fire.  At least 15,000 people sought medical treatment due to health issues related to the fire, and 23,900 claims had been filed as of last week to cover costs incurred due to the blaze.

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Northwest Port Expansions will Fuel Coal Industry’s Contributions to Mass Extinction

7 Feb

Cross posted from Deep Green Resistance News Service

By Rachel Ivey / Deep Green Resistance Cascadia

In the arid Powder River Basin of Northern Wyoming and Southern Montana, the long roots of sagebrush draw water from deep beneath the soil.  The ability to access water in this way makes sagebrush an important star of the Basin’s biotic constellation.  Species of grasses and herbs are allowed to thrive on the moisture that the sagebrush draws toward the surface.

Elk, mule deer, and pronghorn antelope access the water stored in the plant’s pale gray, three-pointed leaves.  Greater sage-grouse eat the sagebrush too, while making their nests and performing their complex courtship rituals among the plant’s low branches.  The soil is the urlbasis for the lives of these creatures and countless others, and the precious moisture within the soil is thread that connects them in a web of relationship.

The Powder River Basin’s coal extraction industry doesn’t place the same value on soil, and neither does the government that serves the coal extraction industry.  The region extracts about forty percent of the coal mined in the United States.  More coal is mined annually from the Powder River Basin than is mined annually from the entire Appalachian region.

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Disturbing Greg Boyce’s Peace: StopPeabody Activists Kidnapped by Hotel Security

30 Jan
Flyer distributed near Peabody CEO Greg Boyce's St. Louis home identifying him as a

Activists were arrested distributing this flyer near Peabody CEO Boyce’s apartment

Activists were arrested distributing this flyer near Peabody CEO Boyce’s apartment

Two activists were arrested for distributing this flyer near the apartment of Peabody Energy CEO Greg Boyce on Tuesday inside the Chase Park Plaza hotel and apartment complex. The activists were charged with disturbing the peace and released after eight hours in custody.

Earlier that morning, a small group known as the “Chase Park Plaza Committee for Non-Evil” leafletted inside the building’s parking garage, posting warnings to tenants and guests that Boyce, a “known climate criminal,” resides inside the building. The flyer states: “Mr. Boyce’s crimes, while too extensive and storied to detail completely here, reveal a legacy of gross disregard for the city of St. Louis, workers’ rights, human life, and the future of the planet as a whole,” and features criticism of Peabody’s complicity in the forced relocation of Dineh (Navajo) families from their ancestral homeland in Black Mesa, Arizona. Activists also used the flyer to highlight Peabody’s efforts to shirk on their obligations to retired coal miners, as well as the massive $61 million tax break that Peabody received from the city of St. Louis in 2010.

Read the rest here.

3-week Winter Action Camp, St. Louis, January

19 Dec

APPLY NOW:  For the MORE-RAMPS-BMIS Winter Action Camp

RAMPS action against Mountaintop Removal

RAMPS action against Mountaintop Removal

The camp will feature a 2-week (Jan 7-20) and 3-week (Jan 7-27) option. There will be two featured tracks, direct action and community organizing, with significant overlap and emphasis put on how these fundamental aspects of resistance fit together. Both tracks will include multiple actions targeting extractive industries and provide a solid set of skills that can be used in any campaign. Both tracks are a full-time commitment and will include intensive training and hands-on experience.

St. Louis is home to five coal companies (including Arch, Patriot and Peabody) agri-giant Monsanto and leading frack sand provider (Mississippi Sands)–just to name a few.

As Arch attempts to destroy Blair Mountain, Patriot shirks paying thousands of retired miners’ pensions, Peabody continues to pollute water in Black Mesa, and so much more, their CEOs hide in St. Louis, far from most of the communities whose health, water and way of life they are destroying.

In January, MORE, RAMPS, BMIS and members of the Black Mesa/Big Mountain communities are coming together for the 1st urban Winter Action Camp in St. Louis as yet another part of the growing national uprising against economic and resource extraction.

Build community organizing & direct action skills. Hold CEOs accountable. Grow a movement. Join the winter action camp. 

Apply here today, space is limited!

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