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Destruction of Police Facility Claimed by UK Anarchist Groups as Response to Badger Cull

30 Aug

by Sunita Patel-Carstairs / The Telegraph

Radicals from two groups – the Angry Foxes Cell and the ACAB (All Coppers Are Bastards) – said they started the fire to coincide with the start of the cull.

They claim they poured accelerants on electrics at the half-built centre on Monday night and “left it with flames licking high”.

Their strike was part of a “night of action” against the authorities, which included attacking two vehicles used by prison security services.

 A fire at a police training area in Portishead, Bristol, sends out a giant plume of smoke. An anarchist group opposed to the badger cull has claimed responsibility for the fire which gutted a £16million police firing range Photo: SWNS.com


A fire at a police training area in Portishead, Bristol, sends out a giant plume of smoke. An anarchist group opposed to the badger cull has claimed responsibility for the fire which gutted a £16million police firing range Photo: SWNS.com

Firefighters on Wednesday were still battling to extinguish the blaze at the Black Rock Quarry centre in Portishead, near Bristol, 36 hours after it was started.

The statement by the ‘Angry Foxes Cell in collaboration with ACAB’ said: “It put smiles on our faces to realise how easy it was to enter their gun club and leave a f*** you signature right in the belly of the beast, with a curious fox as our only witness.

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South Africa Shale Pits Shell Against Sheep Farmers

28 Aug

by Paul Burkhardt / Bloomberg

Shell applied for permission in 2011 to drill 24 exploratory wells in the Karoo. GO!/Gallo Images/Getty Images

Shell applied for permission in 2011 to drill 24 exploratory wells in the Karoo. GO!/Gallo Images/Getty Images

Royal Dutch Shell Plc (RDSA)s shale gas drilling plans for South Africa’s Karoo semi-desert are pitting the government and its energy goals against farmers and conservationists like billionaire Johann Rupert who say the land will be spoiled.

The government estimates enough gas can be discovered to generate 1 trillion rand ($100 billion) of sales within three decades and help bring a country that imports 70 percent of its crude oil needs closer to supplying its own energy demand. Landowners are lining up against the water-intensive drilling techniques that Europes biggest oil company intends to use.

“People don’t see what will happen,” Izak van der Merwe, a 59-year old sheep farmer, said as he sipped a beer while walking down a line of freshly slain antelope at the Murraysburg Hunting Competition, 620 kilometers (385 miles) northeast of Cape Town. “The people at Shell don’t realize the kind of ecosystem we have.”

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Undercover at the Tar Sands: What It’s Really Like Working for Big Oil

28 Aug

An anonymous worker reveals conditions at ground zero for Canada’s controversial pipelines

from Rolling Stone

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from Getty Images

Editor’s Note: In recent months, many climate activists have focused their efforts on Canada’s tar sands and the companies set on extracting fossil fuels from them. With the debate raging louder than ever, Rolling Stone is in contact with one of the workers helping to build a pipeline to bring oil from the tar sands to the U.S. Read on for that anonymous correspondent’s second dispatch from one of the world’s most controversial jobs.

On its surface, Fort McMurray, Alberta, looks like any other small Canadian city, with rows of new houses, condo developments and a Wal-Mart. Recycling bins line the streets, and residents schlep cloth bags to the store because the community banned plastic bags. But there’s one big difference between Fort Mac and other towns: This is ground zero for Canada’s controversial tar sands operations. Like tens of thousands of others, I saw green in the tar-like bitumen-drenched sand, and I came here to cash in. (I’m writing anonymously to protect my colleagues, my friends and myself.)

Read Our Undercover Correspondent’s First Dispatch from the Tar Sands

The majority of oil-related work happens north of town. Follow Highway 63 for about 20 minutes and you’ll see a sprawling series of smoke stacks at the Syncrude Canada Ltd. processing facility. You can smell the oil in the air, and smog hangs across the otherwise crisp northern horizon. Drive further, and things get even worse. Koch Carbon’s giant pile of petroleum coke in Detroit is nothing compared to what the oil companies have up here. Shell, Imperial Oil, Exxon, Encana, Husky, BP, Suncor Energy, CNR, Southern Pacific and Petro-Canada all have a stake in this game, and there’s an estimated 170 billion barrels of crude on the line.

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Mink and Foxes Freed from Ontario Fur Farm

27 Aug

anonymous report / Bite Back

“In the early morning of August 26, 2013, the ALF raided Royal Oak Fur Farm in Simcoe, Ontario. We approached the fur farm and laid down in the tall grass so we could watch the guard’s building for any sign of movement. Once we were satisfied it was empty, we cut the bands that attach the chainlink fence to the poles and then tore a large area of fence down at the back of the farm and opened the front gate. We estimate we released about 750 mink and 50 fox. The fox almost seemed to understand what was happening because once they realized they were free, they wasted no time leaving their cages and escaping through the holes we made in the fence. After the fur farmers house lights flicked on, we quickly started pulling off breeding cards and tossing them around the empty cages, and then made our retreat through the corn fields with a noisy group of mink experiencing their first taste of freedom. We won’t stop until this, and all fur farms are empty. – ALF”

Activist Group Black Fish Using Drones to Defend the Ocean from Driftnets

26 Aug

by Alex Chitty / Vice

The Black Fish’s founder Wietse van der Werf. Photo by Chris Grodotzki.

The Black Fish’s founder Wietse van der Werf. Photo by Chris Grodotzki.

On a warm night in July 2012, off the island of Ugljan in the Croatian Adriatic, two activists slipped into the water near a line of huge fish farms. Security boats patrolled the perimeter of the vast circular nets, as guards stationed on a nearby hill kept watch through the night. And for good reason: the thousands of bluefin tuna in the farms, destined for the tables of Japanese sushi restaurants, are worth millions. Individual fish routinely sell for more than $1,500 at wholesale markets in Tokyo and closer to home. The Croatian tuna had been caught as juveniles under a loophole in international law, and were being “fattened up” before heading to market.

Wearing tactical diving gear, the divers arrived at the first net, slicing three-quarters of its length and sending bluefin streaming out. The divers swam to another net, repeating the process, and then headed home. The security teams circling above were none the wiser until the following day. The activists, from a group known as the Black Fish, were long gone. The raid was similar to a previous attack in September 2010, when Black Fish divers freed dolphins from holding pens near Taiji, Japan.

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Pilot Whale and Dolphin Slaughter in the Faroe Islands

25 Aug

by Erwin Vermeulen / Sea Shepherd Conservation Society

On August 13th, 135 long-finned pilot whales were brutally slaughtered in Húsavík.

On August 13th, 135 long-finned pilot whales were brutally slaughtered in Húsavík.

It’s been an extremely bloody few weeks in the Ferocious Isles, even by Faroese standards. On August 8, 107 Long-finned Pilot whales were slaughtered in Sandavágur. On August 11, 21 were butchered in Leynar and on the 13th, 135 lost their lives in Húsavík.

The grind(adrap), as the Pilot whale drive is called, has a recorded history since 1584. There are 23 whaling bays assigned to six districts in which the meat and blubber are divided among the population. A drive is initiated when fishermen or ferries offshore sight dolphins. The dolphins are driven into a bay with boats and even jet skis and pulled up onto the beach with a hook in the blowhole. Then the spinal cord is cut with a knife.

The Húsavík massacre on the 13th was not the only one that took place that day. In Hvalba, the incredibly high number of 430 Atlantic White-sided dolphins were driven into ‘whale bay’ and brutally murdered. Some people might be surprised to hear that these islanders are targeting species other than Pilot whales, but they have always hunted smaller dolphins, especially in Hvalba. They last killed Atlantic White-sided dolphins in Hvalba in August 2010 and Risso’s dolphins earlier that year in April. Oravik took 100 Atlantic White-sided dolphins in August 2009. That same month, Hvalba killed two Northern Bottlenose whales that were reported as stranded, and a month later Klaksvik took three Risso’s. In June 1978 that town even butchered 31 Orcas.

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Cattle Auction Website Hacked

22 Aug

from Bite Back

received anonymously (translation – seguir adelante para español):

“In these images you can see the before and after of our visit, you can see a small modification. Similarly other modifications were made to the website which, though not visible on the main page, surely will take them a few hours to return to how they had it, if they can. On the page, all references to the sale of cattle were removed. All the orders, auctions, types of animals auctioned and some news.
The hacked website is http://www.unionganadera.com and although our way to enter it was with tools to get user names and passwords, the lack of security on the page was surprising. The user name was ‘Admin’ (without quotes) and the password was ‘123456’ (again without quotes).

While there are those who benefit from suffering, we’ll be there.
We will not allow the torture and murder to happen freely.
FLA”

before

after

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