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Less Than 60 Hours Left to Support Indigenous Land Defenders!

18 Feb

Screen shot 2014-02-18 at 11.25.22 AMby Amanda Lickers from Reclaim Turtle Island

As yall know, self-representation and independent media are key.

You might have heard about Reclaim Turtle Island , which is a budding platform for Indigenous-run grassroots media projects. Right now we need your support! Literally all across Turtle Island, Indigenous Nations are combating reservation apartheid and industrial genocide. This means fierce ‘n’ frontline resistance to resource extraction! Everything from tar sands, pipelines, fracking, to mining, Land Defenders are throwing down to protect our lands and build up our communities, regaining identity and reclaiming territories.

Born in late 2013, we focused on supporting the Mi’kmaq Warriors fighting fracking, and put out our first short film! Co-produced with subMedia.tv, titled Kahsatstenhsera – Indigenous Resistance to Tar Sands Pipelines.

Reclaim Turtle Island is a form of anti-colonial cultural production and is primarily focused on producing media for and by Indigenous folks, helping to inspire to strive for total liberation. We are raising funds for a few simple reasons.

#1 is equipment. We want to produce high-quality short films that educate and elevate! This means audio, post-production editing tools, data storage (so many hard drives), etc!

The other main reason is that we are in the midst of production right now!!!!

*Funds from this project will go to:

Film production, including Dine’ resistance to frack-sand mining, uranium mining and cultural revitalization and sovereignty projects, Lakota and Ponca resistance to tar sands pipelines, Innu resistance to Plan Nord, and more…

Travel for an ACFN grassroots organizer to attend an important gathering in Lakota territory, marking their 2014 Liberation Day and furthering conversations about tar sands resistanc…

Equipment needed for film-production, such as audio, post-production editing, etc…

Even a small donation will help us reach our goal!!

Donate here.

Nia:wen’kowa – Great thanks!  Your support can help make this happen.

 

Twitter @defendourlands / Facebook 

(amanda lickers, turtle clan/ onondowa’ga haudenosaunee is a curator for Reclaim Turtle Island an anti-pipeline organizer based in tiotiah:ke, so-called montreal @amandalickers)

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Michigan Tar Sands Pipeline Protester Could Get Two Years in Jail

2 Sep

remember-the-kalamazoo-signby John Upton / Grist

One oil spill in his community was more than enough for Kalamazoo resident Christopher Wahmhoff.

To protest Enbridge’s replacement of the pipeline that burst along a Michigan riverbank in 2010, Wahmhoff spent 10 hours of his 35th birthday inside the new pipe, slowing construction for a single day in June. [SeeActivist Has Climbed in Enbridge Tar Sands Pipe in Michigan” for the story.]

Now Wahmhoff, a member of the Michigan Coalition Against Tar Sands [aka MI-CATS], has been charged with two felonies and a misdemeanor, charges that could see him put behind bars for more than two years.

“It was worth it, without a doubt,” he told the Battle Creek Enquirer on Tuesday following a preliminary hearing before a district judge. “We got awareness out.”

The prosecutorial overreaction is all the more striking because of the peacefulness of Wahmhoff’s protest. Though he refused to come out of the pipeline until 5 p.m., Sheriff Department Detective Steve Hinkley told the court, “He was very cooperative.”

Wahmhoff’s wrongdoings certainly pale in comparison to Enbridge’s. When the company’s improperly maintained pipeline ruptured in 2010, it led to the nation’s largest-ever onshore oil spill. More than a million gallons of goopy, toxic tar-sands oil spilled into the Kalamazoo River and a tributary, and up to 180,000 gallons are still contaminating the river bottom today. So who’s the criminal here?

Undercover at the Tar Sands: What It’s Really Like Working for Big Oil

28 Aug

An anonymous worker reveals conditions at ground zero for Canada’s controversial pipelines

from Rolling Stone

082813-tar-field-600-1377705294

from Getty Images

Editor’s Note: In recent months, many climate activists have focused their efforts on Canada’s tar sands and the companies set on extracting fossil fuels from them. With the debate raging louder than ever, Rolling Stone is in contact with one of the workers helping to build a pipeline to bring oil from the tar sands to the U.S. Read on for that anonymous correspondent’s second dispatch from one of the world’s most controversial jobs.

On its surface, Fort McMurray, Alberta, looks like any other small Canadian city, with rows of new houses, condo developments and a Wal-Mart. Recycling bins line the streets, and residents schlep cloth bags to the store because the community banned plastic bags. But there’s one big difference between Fort Mac and other towns: This is ground zero for Canada’s controversial tar sands operations. Like tens of thousands of others, I saw green in the tar-like bitumen-drenched sand, and I came here to cash in. (I’m writing anonymously to protect my colleagues, my friends and myself.)

Read Our Undercover Correspondent’s First Dispatch from the Tar Sands

The majority of oil-related work happens north of town. Follow Highway 63 for about 20 minutes and you’ll see a sprawling series of smoke stacks at the Syncrude Canada Ltd. processing facility. You can smell the oil in the air, and smog hangs across the otherwise crisp northern horizon. Drive further, and things get even worse. Koch Carbon’s giant pile of petroleum coke in Detroit is nothing compared to what the oil companies have up here. Shell, Imperial Oil, Exxon, Encana, Husky, BP, Suncor Energy, CNR, Southern Pacific and Petro-Canada all have a stake in this game, and there’s an estimated 170 billion barrels of crude on the line.

Continue reading

Hey Earth First!, Time to Get Busy!

20 Aug

earth-firstMore Full Time Direct Action campaigns about to kick off this Summer…

from Earth First! Newswire

At the 2012 Earth First! Rendezvous, during the 4th in a series of workshops intending to “Give EF! a Kick in the Ass,” facilitators proposed what was initially called the “FTDA Pledge” [FTDA = Full Time Direct Action]. The result was a list of people who expressed the desire to be contacted when crucial campaigns were in need of support at critical times.

The workshop discussed what sort of criteria would be used in making these “call-outs” for support.

What was decided together was that they should be: (1) Strategic and well thought-out campaigns, (2) Community-led with strong local organizing looking for support, (3) Against mega-infrastructure

With goals being strong participation in actions that can strengthen the EF! network; renew the culture and spirit of ecological resistance; and radicalize other movements, groups and individuals.

According to EF!ers on the ground last year in East Texas, the Tar Sands Blockades fit very squarely in these criteria, so we called for support from EF! activists around the US, and they came.

There has since been a suggestion to call the FTDA pledge “the Crunch” (a nod to the Movement for a New Society), highlighting the limited window of space that is often present for a rapid escalation of direct action tactics and strategy. 

The following text is modified from an email sent out to EF! activists nationwide regarding organizing efforts which have been discussed and found to also fit the above criteria. If you can plug in to these campaigns over the next few weeks with skills, supplies, time, energy, funds, etc, it could be pivotal moments for the growth of the movement.

Check out the details below. Send it out over local EF! lists. Hope to see you out there.  Continue reading

Undercover Agents Infiltrated Tar Sands Action Training

12 Aug

Documents reveal that law enforcement gained “great deal of trust,” infiltrated action planning meeting, and collected demographic information of activists

by Adam Federman / Earth Island Journal

After a week of careful planning, environmentalists attending a tar sands resistance action camp in Oklahoma thought they had the element of surprise—but they would soon learn that their moves were being closely watched by law enforcement officials and TransCanada, the very company they were targeting.

gptsrcamp

According to documents obtained by Earth Island Journal, investigators from the Bryan County Sherriff’s Department had been spying on a Great Plains Tar Sands Resistance training camp that took place from March 18 to March 22 and which brought together local landowners, Indigenous communities and environmental groups opposed to the pipeline. 

On the morning of March 22 activists had planned to block the gates at the company’s strategic oil reserves in Cushing, OK, as part of the larger protest movement against TransCanada’s tar sands pipeline. But when they showed up in the early morning hours and began unloading equipment from their vehicles they were confronted by police officers. Stefan Warner, an organizer with Great Plains Tar Sands Resistance, says some of the vehicles en route to the protest site were pulled over even before they had reached Cushing. He estimates that roughly 50 people would have participated—either risking arrest or providing support. The act of nonviolent civil disobedience, weeks in the planning, was called off.

Continue reading

Tar Sands Stock Tanks After Direct Action in Utah

6 Aug

by Lauren Berlekamp / Ecowatch.com

utahtarsands-500If you are thinking about investing in tar sands oil in Utah—think again.

US Oil Sands’ stock price fell further down the road to failure when a group of nonviolent activists gathered last week at the site of the first proposed tar sands mine in the country. Dozens of people peacefully overtook the operations, effectively shutting down for the entire day road construction of the Seep Ridge Road expansion project and work at the mine in Utah’s Book Cliffs. 

According to KCSG Television, the company’s stock price on the Toronto Stock Exchange had closed July 26 at $0.115. After the direct action enforced a full-day shutdown the following Monday, July 29, US Oil Sands’ stock price had dropped to $0.10, down 50 percent from the company’s 52-week high.

“Investors have taken notice that these tar sands and oil shale projects in Utah will be made impossible,” says Peaceful Uprising‘s Melanie Martin. “The fools-gold nature of these resources, the dangerous potential to poison air and water as well as the people’s drive to prevent their progress all add up to an investment blackhole.”

Video: Activists Shut Down First Tar Sands Mine in Utah

3 Aug

by Main Canyon / Peaceful Uprising

Respect Existence, or Expect Resistance!

Earlier this week activists converged at PR Springs, site of the first proposed tar sands mine in the United States. They shut down work at the mine, and road construction, for the entire day.

 

For more information visit: http://www.peacefuluprising.org/actioncampaction

Please LIKE and SHARE to let US Oil Sands know–if you build it, WE WILL COME!

Check out Climate Justice Activists Occupy Two Tar Sands Mining Sites in Utah for an earlier report on this action.