Tag Archives: animal rights

Prisoner Support: Two Activists Arrested with “Burglary Tools” in Rural Illinois

3 Sep

Animal rights activists held in jail for allegedly possessing wire cutters.

from Animal Liberation Frontline

KevinTyler111Los Angeles animal rights activists Kevin Olliff and Tyler Lang have been arrested in rural Illinois, charged with felony “possession of burglary tools.”

These are the facts of the case that are known right now:

The two were pulled over late at night in Roanoke, Illinois in what appears to be a routine traffic stop. When they refused consent to a search of the vehicle, the police searched the vehicle anyway. Inside, police allege they found bolt cutters, wire cutters, muriatic acid, ski masks, and cammo clothing.

Kevin Olliff and Tyler Lang were subsequently arrested for “possession of burglary tools.”  The police have not made any statement as to what they believe the intended “burglary” target was, and Kevin & Tyler were not arrested on anyone’s property. Their history as activists appears to be the sole basis for the charges.

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Sabotaging the Badger Cull

2 Sep

Activists flood the Somerset cull zone as guns start firing

badgerfacefrom SchNEWS

The shooting of badgers in Somerset has started this week. The cull is aiming to kill over 70% of the badger population in the area in a misguided attempt to stop tuberculosis (TB) in cattle. The TB problem is mainly down to poor farming practices and inbreeding of the cows, (see Schnews 836) but some would rather scapegoat badgers. Gloucestershire has not started their cull yet, but may do next week.

There has always been huge public opposition to killing badgers and the start of the shooting has seen some of those people taking direct action. As soon as the marksmen started shooting, there were people sabotaging it. Stop the Cull reported the first incident on Tuesday night in the Stogumber area when people heard shots and then some people made enough noise to send the badgers safe underground. The shooting stopped. Since then, there seem to have been problems for the marksmen every time badger friendly people find them. Finding them is a bit tricky, which is why more people are needed to help.

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Gagged by Big Ag: How Exposing Abuse Became a Crime

17 Jun
Illustration by Tim O'Brien

Illustration by Tim O’Brien

Horrific abuse. Rampant contamination. And the crime is…exposing it?

by Ted Genoways / Mother Jones

Shawn Lyons was dead to rights—and he knew it. More than a month had passed since People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals had released a video of savage mistreatment at the MowMar Farms hog confinement facility where he worked as an entry-level herdsman in the breeding room. The three enormous sow barns in rural Greene County, Iowa, were less than five years old and, until recently, had raised few concerns. They seemed well ventilated and well supplied with water from giant holding tanks. Their tightly tacked steel siding always gleamed white in the sun. But the PETA hidden-camera footage shot by two undercover activists over a period of months in the summer of 2008, following up on a tip from a former employee, showed a harsh reality concealed inside.

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Undercover Video, Ag Gag and Where We Get It Wrong

28 Apr

How should the animal rights and environmental movement use undercover footage of illegal practices? This article argues that the current trend of using footage to prosecute individual workers may be taking blame and attention away from industries of abuse.

Cross posted from The Vegan Police:

opednews.com

image from opednews.com

I’ve followed the introduction of Ag Gag Bills – bills designed to criminalize undercover video of animal use industry – since they were in the dream phase in the wake of the Conklin Dairy Farm undercover video in 2010. That particular undercover investigation, I feel, is one of the most important undercover video investigations in the history of the “animal rights” movement and set the stage for the current battles around Ag Gag bills as well as our movements response.

The footage captured in that investigation was horrific and one particular character seemed to take pleasure in extreme violence against animals on the farm – Billy Joe Gregg Jr. It was nearly impossible to watch that footage and not dream of justice – whether you were a regular member of the public or a hardened animal liberationist. Animal agriculture – across the country – went into overdrive to recognize this particular weakness and exploited it. Billy Joe Gregg Jr. was the “bad apple,” the fall guy. The movement as a whole was so wrapped up in this character, in this horrific footage, that very few people questioned the structure of industrialized animal use or the precedent being set – the singling out and criminalization of individual workers as a movement strategy and measure of “success.”

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ALF Releases 29 Rabbits from Barcelona Factory Farm

27 Apr

Cross posted from Bite Back:

received anonymously (translation):

29 Rabbits Liberated From a Factory Farm in Barcelona

On the night of April 13, 2013, Animal Liberation Front activists opened the cages of thirty rabbits who were to be killed in a few days. The initial goal was to get many more out, but when we arrived we saw that because of their enormous size and weight it would be impossible to liberate the number we had thought, so with great effort we carried away our backpacks full of our new and surprised friends.

If you’ve ever seen the terrified eyes of an animal in a cage and then felt their heart beating next to yours at the time of their release, you know exactly the meaning of Animal Liberation. After seeing them locked in small cages without soil, and then later see them walk and feel the wild life, you know that while you have strength, you won’t stop fighting for Total Liberation.

We’re not going to ask for their cages to be larger or comfortable.
We’re not going to ask that the conditions in which they are tortured in experiments are ‘improved,’
We’re not going to ask that when they are killed, that it be done ‘humanely’… Continue reading

New Ag-Gag Bill Introduced in North Carolina on Same Day Butterball Worker Pleads Guilty to Cruelty

11 Apr

Posted from Green is the New Red

North Carolina is the latest state to consider a new law targeting whistleblowers, undercover investigators, and journalists who expose factory farms. The legislation was introduced on the same day that a fifth Butterball employee pled guilty to criminal cruelty to animals — charges that wouldn’t be possible without the undercover investigations that bills like this aim to criminalize.

The wave of legislation called “ag-gag” bills has been met with increasingly mainstream media exposure and outrage, such as the excellent front page story in the New York Times this week.

North Carolina’s SB 648, the “Commerce Protection Act,” is a good example of how corporations and industry groups are responding to the media backlash. Continue reading

Indiana Bill Would Make It Illegal to Expose Factory Farms, Clearcutting and Fracking

2 Apr

Yeah.. Like this picture would be a no-go.

Re-posted from Green is the New Red

Indiana lawmakers are considering a bill that would make it illegal to photograph or videotape things like factory farming, clear-cutting forests, mining, and fracking.

You read that correctly. Under Indiana’s SB 0373, anyone who sets foot on corporate property in order to document environmental, animal welfare, and health violations of these industries would face criminal penalties.

The bill has already passed the Senate, and is on track to pass the full House. It is part of a wave of similar legislation introduced across the country that have been dubbed “ag-gag” bills. [Here’s a detailed look at ag-gag efforts nationally.] But Indiana is poised to become the first state to pass an ag-gag bill this year.

This ag-gag trend is the brainchild of the Big Ag industry, working with the American Legislative Exchange Council. What’s especially troubling about Indiana’s bill, though, is that it extends far beyond factory farms to the timber, mining, and manufacturing industries. Continue reading