Tag Archives: Arizona

Hurdles Remain for U.S. Jaguar Habitat

24 Jan

By Leslie Macmillan / New York Times Green

[Fish and Wildlife Service] A jaguar observed last October by a camera trap in southern Arizona.

[Fish and Wildlife Service] A jaguar observed last October by a camera trap in southern Arizona.

Last fall, remote cameras in a rugged expanse of desert grasslands in Southern Arizona captured arresting images of a jaguar slinking through the underbrush, its yellow eyes fixed on some distant sight. The photos add to the dozen or so documented sightings of the endangered cat on American soil in the last century.

The monitoring project, conducted by the University of Arizona in conjunction with the federal Fish and Wildlife Service, is providing data that will inform decisions about a proposed critical habitat for the big cat: 838,000 acres in Southern Arizona and New Mexico, an area roughly the size of Rhode Island. Continue reading

Federal Warrants Issued Against Protect The Peaks Activists

11 Dec
photo-by-theo

Flagstaff, AZ community members “quarantine” Coconino National Forest Service lobby

National Forest Service Announces New Sacred Sites Policy at the Same Time That Flagstaff Peaks Activists Are Targeted with Federal Charges and Arrest Warrants

Peaks Activists Vow to Fight Charges and Plan to Turn themselves Over to U.S. Marshalls

FLAGSTAFF, AZ — On the same day that secretary Tom Vilsack of the US Department of Agriculture issued a final report on Sacred Sites and an inter-agency memorandum to work towards Sacred Sites protection, the Coconino Forest Service filed federal charges against four Sacred Sites advocates who were part of a protest at the Forest Service offices three months earlier.
 
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ReWilding the West

1 Jul

Remembering a Tucson Radical

by Russ McSpadden / Earth First! News

[The text of this work is free to share and distribute under the following Creative Commons License CC-BY-ND 3.0]

Most of the heroes of the Wild West, the rootin’ tootin’ movie cowboys, sheriffs, miners, ranchers, saloon owners and cavalry generals, had a real knack for replacing all the wild land they got a hold of with profiteering schemes. These are the folks that actually killed the Wild West, bought it up, fenced it in, murdered and incarcerated many of its indigenous people, destroyed its communities with alcoholism, stripped its land, averted and drained its waters, blasted its mountains, decimated its wildlife, made extinct its wolves and jaguars and generally can be thanked for the Bone-Dry SuburbanTame West of today. I’m saying, as far as wild goes, these boys paved the way for the wild-ass time you are having right now working your service job slinging coffee to hipsters.

No, the real heroes of the Wild West would have to actually fight to keep the place wild. They’d want to burn the banks and the miner camps, fend off the encroachment of a domesticating middle-class culture and take pot shots at the troops from the Dragoons. They might even take a bullet for a mountain lion.

Not too long ago we had just such a fellow out here in Tucson, and seeing as its his birthday on July 3rd it might be nice to remember this real Wild West hero for some of the amazing and crazy shit he did to fight for what wild we got left out there,and inside of ourselves as well.

Rod Coronado, who is turning 47 this year, is a Yaqui Pascua Indian, a writer and poet, a father, lover of nature and animals, felon and eco-anarchist. He’s the kind of guy that could tell you all about the native flowers growing out of the cracks in the sidewalk and how to make rudimentary bombs, though he’s done with the latter these days. Akin to the wily, earth loving and dangerous characters in Edward Abbey’s novel The Monkeywrench Gang, [and remember, Abbey was also a Tucson local] Coronado was a real outlaw for the wild, not a violent human in terms of hurting people, but also not afraid to utterly destroy any non-sentient instrument of oppression.

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Proposed Uranium Mining in Grand Canyon Region

12 Oct

 

Today GOP lawmakers led by Senator John McCain (R-AZ) and Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ) announced legislation that would open one million acres of public lands forming Grand Canyon National Park’s watershed to new uranium mining. The bill would overturn an existing moratorium on new mining and mining claims.

“It is unconscionable that Senator McCain and Representatives Flake and Franks are seeking to undermine protections for Grand Canyon and its watershed and showing so little regard for the people of Arizona, including all of those who expressed strong support for protecting these lands from uranium mining and the pollution it produces,” said Sandy Bahr, chapter director, Sierra Club – Grand Canyon Chapter.

The Grand Canyon and four corners region still suffer the pollution legacy of past mining. American Indian tribes in the region – Havasupai, Hualapai, Kaibab-Paiute, Navajo, and Hopi – have banned uranium mining on their lands. Water in Horn Creek, located in Grand Canyon National Park just below the old Orphan uranium mine, exhibits dissolved uranium concentrations over 10 times the health-based standards established by the Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water, while groundwater sumps below old mines north of Grand Canyon have measured dissolved uranium more than 1000 times allowable for drinking water standards.

“Neither mining corporations, lawmakers nor public agencies can guarantee that uranium mining wouldn’t further contaminate aquifers feeding Grand Canyon’s springs and creeks. Such pollution—as we see in Horn Creek today–would be impossible to clean up,” said Taylor McKinnon with the Center for Biological Diversity. “A decade ago Senator McCain was a defender of Grand Canyon. Today he’s one its greatest threats.”

Earth First! means a world without borders

29 Apr

By an editor of the EF! Journal

Jaguar photographed in arizona

Solidarity with immigrants against borders is one of the most practical and relevant places for the biocentrist—deep ecologist, eco-anarchist, Earth First!er.. or whatever you may call yourself—to present our vision of the world beyond civilization. The border is not just a line between two places. Its a scar on the earth, and in our lives, where empire and ecocide have met. Millions of people in North America feels this environmental and social tragedy in a deep and direct way.

The reality of this has been close to home for us here at the Earth First! Journal/Newswire, from life in Arizona in the midst of the SB 1070 law and the militarized border lands, to our new office in the south, which is now embroiled in the battles surrounding anti-immigrant legislation. Georgia became the first state following the footsteps of Arizona’s “Papers Please” law—HB 87, they are only awaiting the Governor to sign it into law—and, despite mass opposition, Florida is not far behind, with SB 2040.

"We will not comply," blockade at Sheriff Arpaio's Maricopa County Jail in Arizona after SB1070 goes into effect, July 2010

Arbitrary borders divided by walls and high-tech surveillance are becoming one of the most drastic symbols of literal human division and disconnect from the wild world around them. The same principles of rewilding that apply to keeping healthy, biodiverse habitats also apply to the re-wilding the free spirit of our species. What borders walls do to the endangered Jaguar, immigration laws due to our own wild spirits.

The past two issues of the EF! Journal have run excellent articles on borders, immigration, biocentrism and ecological resistance. Check ‘em out below.. May they assist in fueling the flames of immigrant solidarity and rebellion.   For freedom of movement to all species!

The Capitol building in Tallahassee, Florida is occupied by immigrants, predominantly from indigenous campesino communities in Central America.

Razing Arizona: the ecological battle against borders (an overview of pro-immigrant, anti-border articles from the past 10 years of the EF! Journal. In Spanish and English.)

Borders & Bodies (a personal reflection from an EF! Journal editor of borders, colonization and empire from the Arizona border to the coasts of Florida.)

(Also, don’t miss the coming issue of the EF! Journal, this June, for a fresh new article on the Center for Biological Diversity’s effort to defend Jaguars from extinction in the US by the racist border wall.)

Check out news and video from the growing resistance in Florida.

Simultaneous protests for immigrant farmworker solidarity take also place this week. Here, at a grand opening of Grocery chain Public in Lake Worth, FL, new home to the Earth First! Journal.

Arizona issues permits for three uranium mines near Grand Canyon

22 Mar


The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) has approved water and air quality permits for three uranium mines near the Grand Canyon, including the Arizona 1 mine and the proposed Canyon Mine near Red Butte, a site held sacred by the Havasupai Nation. Brenda Norrell reports.

Read the full story here.

News Roundup 5/13

13 May

Skytruth estimates that, actually,  1.1 million gallons of oil per day are now spilling into the Gulf. The feds won’t reveal any actual information about the amount, because that would lead to cleanup costs billions of $ higher than the current estimate of less than $1 billion.

Tucson students walked out of school and occupied a state building downtown in protest of a new law canceling ethnic studies in all Arizona schools. Pictures here.

Here’s an update on Scott DeMuth, Minnesota’s favorite grand jury resister. Some friends of his are going on a roadshow this summer to raise money for his legal defense. Here’s their support site.

A bunch of badasses pulled off an awesome direct action at the Westin Hotel in SF:

Make sure you sleep with the right people if you’re going to this year’s Pride. More info here. This action brought to you by the Brass Liberation Orchestra.

Check out the Dark Mountain Project: primitivism gone mainstream in the UK. They’re having an “UnCivilisation Gathering” at the end of the month, tickets being £60 apiece payable by credit/debit/paypal online. Oh, the irony.

Over 33,000 mink, native to North America, have escaped from fur farms in Ireland. Now the Irish government is paying 3 full-time trappers over £1 million over five years to trap as many of them as possible and then shoot the captives with .22s. Of course, pine martens, stoat or hedgehogs will be inadvertently caught in the traps as well, but they’ll supposedly be released “unharmed”. Maybe this wouldn’t be a problem if Ireland hadn’t allowed fur farms in the first place. Northern Ireland doesn’t. More info here on Irish fur farms and those trying to shut ’em down.

And here’s an awesome new anti-mining site from the Philippines.