Tag Archives: art

ELF Attacks On Tourism, Development and Culture in Germany, Russia and Indonesia

3 Sep
Militante Ökos haben sich zum Anschlag auf die Seilbahn am Wurmberg bekannt. © dpa Fotograf: Holger Hollemann

Image of the site prior to sabotage. “Militante Ökos haben sich zum Anschlag auf die Seilbahn am Wurmberg bekannt.”

from Earth First! Newswire

The international ELF presence appears to be on the rise.

Last week it was reported that militant ecologists destroyed parts of a ski lift and an artificial snow production station at the Wurmberg in the Harz region of Germany, declaring themselves to be members of the Earth Liberation Front (ELF). This marks the first reported action of an ELF cell in German-speaking countries.

Der millionenteure Ausbau des Skigebiets für den Tourismus wird heftig kritisiert. (Archivbild) © dpa Fotograf: Stefan Rampfel

Area threatened by ski tourism. “Der millionenteure Ausbau des Skigebiets für den Tourismus wird heftig kritisiert.” (Archivbild)

According to initial police estimates, the damage amounts to around 100,000 euros, primarily by cutting numerous electrical lines. The action aimed at protesting the destruction of a sensitive area for the sake of ski tourism.

Earlier in the month, ELF Moscow had this to say:

“About two weeks ago we torched a tracked excavator at the place where workers were destroying Ismailovo park. The vehicle was parked on the side of the highway, where they were adding more lanes to the road. It took us 3-4 minutes to do the job. Continue reading

This Camera Fights Fascism: Photographs of migration and struggle

22 Sep

Photo by David Bacon, Strikers at the D'Arrigo Brothers produce, 1998

Art Exhibit: de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University, California. Opening Thursday, September 22nd, 6PM.

David Bacon and Francisco Dominguez have both followed in the tradition of Depression-era photographers such as Dorothea Lange, focusing their cameras on struggle, dissent, immigrants, and workers. Their photographs speak to the global character of contemporary migration. Like the so-called Okies of the Depression, many of today’s migrants have been displaced by environmental degradation and wider economic forces.

The title of this exhibition refers to a sign that 1930s folk musician Woody Guthrie often had on his guitar, “This Machine Kills Fascists.” These two photographers build a powerful body of visual evidence of the continuing struggle of workers, migrants, and poor people to survive. In this exhibition the photographers responded to images by Dorothea Lange and selected photographs from their own work that draw close connections between the 1930s and today.

David Bacon is a photojournalist who has documented the movements of farm workers, social protest from Iraq and Mexico to the U.S., and the migration of people. He is the author of several books, and many of the images in this show are from Communities Without Borders, Images and Words from the World of Migration.

Francisco Dominguez is a photographer and printmaker. His parents both were farm workers. He documents the struggles of indigenous, immigrant, and poor people in black and white photography.

Click here to view the slide show