Tag Archives: border

This Camera Fights Fascism: Photographs of migration and struggle

22 Sep

Photo by David Bacon, Strikers at the D'Arrigo Brothers produce, 1998

Art Exhibit: de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University, California. Opening Thursday, September 22nd, 6PM.

David Bacon and Francisco Dominguez have both followed in the tradition of Depression-era photographers such as Dorothea Lange, focusing their cameras on struggle, dissent, immigrants, and workers. Their photographs speak to the global character of contemporary migration. Like the so-called Okies of the Depression, many of today’s migrants have been displaced by environmental degradation and wider economic forces.

The title of this exhibition refers to a sign that 1930s folk musician Woody Guthrie often had on his guitar, “This Machine Kills Fascists.” These two photographers build a powerful body of visual evidence of the continuing struggle of workers, migrants, and poor people to survive. In this exhibition the photographers responded to images by Dorothea Lange and selected photographs from their own work that draw close connections between the 1930s and today.

David Bacon is a photojournalist who has documented the movements of farm workers, social protest from Iraq and Mexico to the U.S., and the migration of people. He is the author of several books, and many of the images in this show are from Communities Without Borders, Images and Words from the World of Migration.

Francisco Dominguez is a photographer and printmaker. His parents both were farm workers. He documents the struggles of indigenous, immigrant, and poor people in black and white photography.

Click here to view the slide show

Wild Horse Round Ups, Prison Labor and the Border

16 Aug

In a new trend that connects the taming of the wild, the prison complex and the militarization of the borderlands between the US and Mexico, wild mustangs brutally rounded up throughout the Southwest are being sold to prisons in Nevada and Colorado.

Once there, prison inmates are put to work taming the mustangs that will in turn become tools of Border Patrol to track down and arrest migrants crossing the border.

According to Rafael V. Garza, horse patrol commander for the Border Patrol in the Laredo, Texas, sector, tamed mustang-mounted Border Patrol agents arrested over 500 migrants in the first year of the program. “Its the intimidation factor,” Garza said.

So, wild animals are tamed by confined prisoners in order to make it easier for Border Patrol to confine more migrants, a perfect system of racist and speciesist domination.

And in other Wild Horse News

Advocates can’t stop the controversial round-up of more than 2,000 wild horses and 200 wild burros along the California-Nevada border because it has already happened, the 9th Circuit ruled.
     The federal appeals court in San Francisco on Monday rejected a year-old motion for a restraining order and injunction to halt the round-up in the Twin Peaks Herd Management Area as moot.
     The nonprofits In Defense of Animals and Dreamcatcher Wild Horse and Burro Sanctuary have been battling the Bureau of Land Management since 2009 to halt the round-up, which they claim violates the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The agency has maintained that the round-up is necessary to keep the herds sustainable.
     A lower court denied the groups’ motion in August 2010, with the round-up set to begin within days. A motions panel of the 9th Circuit rejected an emergency move for injunctive relief a few days later, and the round-up went forward, according to the ruling.
     While finding that the plaintiffs’ motion “raises serious legal questions concerning whether the large-scale removal of horses conflicts with the Wild Horses Act and whether an Environmental Impact Statement is required before any action can be implemented,” the panel dismissed it as moot. The motion sought to enjoin only the “effects of implementing the initial phase” of the round-up and to “preserve the status quo.” Neither is possible now, the panel ruled.
     “The horses are currently offsite and the remainder of the plan is apparently going forward,” the panel found, promising that “any further appeals in the underlying action shall be expedited and calendared before this panel.”
     Writing in dissent, Judge Johnnie Rawlinson argued that the issue was not moot because the court can still offer relief by ordering that the horses be returned to the range.
     “It is undisputed that the BLM rounded up all the horses on the range and then decided which horses should be released back into the Twin Peaks area and which should be transported to holding areas,” he wrote. “This would be a different case if the horses who were rounded up had all been dispersed. But that is not what happened. The horses that were rounded up are currently being kept in various holding areas throughout the southwestern United States. As easily as the horses were transported out of their natural habitat, they can be returned.
     In this circumstance, relief is available and the request for injunctive relief is not moot.”