Tag Archives: DGR

Deep Green Resistance: A Book Review

22 May

Deep Green Resistance Book CoverBy RUHE / SproutDistro

Since this review of the book Deep Green Resistance was written, some things have changed: Deep Green Resistance has affirmed their transphobia as their official policy, Earth First! has distanced themselves from DGR, and Aric McBay has left Deep Green Resistance. However, even as DGR seems to crumble due to its anti-trans views, there has still been relatively little discussion of the other problematic aspects of DGR.

Over the summer of 2011, Deep Green Resistance – which bills itself as “an analysis, a strategy, and a movement” – started to gain attention in anarchist circles. This isn’t very surprising, as one of it’s primary theorists is Derrick Jensen – who despite not being an anarchist – has contributed to various anarchist publications such as the now defunct Green Anarchy. In addition, Deep Green Resistance argues in favor of dismantling civilization and advocates for immediately taking the steps necessary to do so – which is sadly an all-too-rare perspective.

Continue reading

Deep Green Resignation and Reclamation

16 May

by former members of DGR Portland

We, former members of the Deep Green Resistance Portland chapter, are hereby severing our ties with Deep Green Resistance and especially with Derrick Jensen and Lierre Keith.

We want to make it very clear that it is in spite of, not because of, the bullying and harassment we have personally received since last weekend that we are standing by our principles and refusing to devolve into hatefulness. Individuals involved have received personal attacks including rape and death threats and we find that abhorrent and, when disproportionately targeted towards women, misogynistic as well.  We renounce trans*phobic statements made by Derrick Jensen, Lierre Keith, and other members of DGR.  We are in solidarity with the many biocentric and anti-civilization people of any gender who are against all forms of oppression and will not accept bigotry in any form.

Continue reading

Lakota People and Allies Block Access to Genocidal Liquor Sales in Whiteclay Again

3 Mar

Oglala President Brewer involved in #ShutDownWhiteClay

On last week’s anniversary of the Occupation of Wounded Knee, February 27, 1973, two bars in Whiteclay, Nebraska were shut down by about 60 activists of the Oglala Lakota Tribe and the Deep Green Resistance (DGR) organization. It would not be the first time they shut them down. DGR and a handful of Lakota have committed to fighting the good fight until they shut down Whiteclay for the past year. Many people can argue that Whiteclay still opens for business the next day. Yet, no one will argue that they have always shut it down while protesting. They have been successful every time, even when members of DGR were arrested and thrown, locked together, in a dirty horse trailer littered with manure.

The number of people showing up to protest has grown significantly. On February 28th, 2013 there were about a hundred, including Oglala Lakota Tribal President Bryan Brewer. The first time in the history of tribal government that an Oglala Sioux Tribal president showed up to help lead his people in a cause that they believe so strongly in. Continue reading

Lakota warriors and Deep Green Resistance call for support on the Great Plains

13 Dec

Activists and warriors have launched a drive for funds and supplies to sustain their ongoing organizing and resistance in the Great Plains region. The following message is from their online drive:

“In 2011 we met and  began working together in a good way. Members of Deep Green Resistance and Lakota warriors and activists joined together to fight on the Great Plains. In 2012 we joined with others to fight against the liquid genocide of White Clay NE, temporarily shutting it down three times. We are fighting and organizing against the Keystone XL pipline. We must protect our sacred water. We joined together in solidarity with Lakota elder Vern Traversie against the racist abuse of Rapid City Regional Hospital. The KKK has reared its ugly head in the sacred black hills and we must stand and fight against them in 2013. We cannot do this work without material support. Besides material support we need bodies willing to join us on the frontlines. Please help us continue fighting in 2013.”

For more information click here or email deepgreenresistancegreatplains@riseup.net

People can also relay this message via Facebook.

For more background on the situation in White Clay and the connections between DGR and Lakota activists, check out the article “Crazy Horse was a Sober Warrior: 31 Notes on the Alcohol Wars at Pine Ridge“, posted September 7 on the EF! Newswire

.

News Round-Up from Eco-Rebellion World Wide

3 Sep

Wow! Its been a wild week, and we’ve gotten a bit behind on the news as several EF! Newswire contributors were tied up in Tampa at the RNC protests. But it looks like that blue moon may have gotten some people pretty riled up! Here’s a compilation of news from the front lines around the world to catch you up a bit…

Tar Sands Blockade Halted Keystone XL Construction

As Hurricane Isaac made landfall in New Orleans on the eve of Hurricane Katrina’s seventh anniversary, climate justice organizers in Texas were locking themselves to the axle of a massive TransCanada semi-truck, carrying 36-inch pipes intended for Keystone XL construction, in hopes that they might turn the climate crisis around.

With help from TransCanada workers themselves, these six people were able to shut down operations at the Livingston pipe yard and cut off the transportation of pipes to construction sites across the southern leg of the Keystone XL pipeline after police were forced to dismantle the truck to make arrests.

The action comes in response to a recent court ruling giving TransCanada the green light to steal a piece of Texas landowner Julia Trigg Crawford’s home. Lamar County Judge Bill Harris practically insulted this local farmer by sending a 15-word summary judgment to her from his iPhone in Washington, DC, August 15.

Anti-corporate protests kick-off DNC in North Carolina

The first march of the DNC convergence, Charlotte, NC

About 1000 people pissed at corporate America marched in Charlotte, NC, yesterday, two days before the Democratic National Convention begins.

According to police, two people were arrested, one for having a concealed knife and another for disorderly conduct.

The demonstrators were members of more than 90 local and national groups. Mortgage foreclosures, high-interest student loans and environmental issues were among their foremost concerns.

Occupy camp carries radical eco message from Tampa to Charlotte.

The protesters marched past the headquarters of Duke Energy, the nation’s biggest electric utility. Security was evident, with several hundred police officers also lining the sidewalks near the Bank of America headquarters.

Beth Henry, 58, a former Charlotte corporate lawyer, took aim at Duke Energy’s environmental record: “To leave our children a ruined world, all we need to do is let companies like Duke Energy keep doing what they’re doing.”   [Source]

Day 10 of villagers’ dam-sit to stop flooding in India

View of Omkareshwar Dam from Siddhnath Temple.

The Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) has received a report from the Narmada Bachao Andolan (NBA) that a large group of villagers who have been evicted from their land without compensation for the construction of the Omkareshwar Dam are sitting within the dam’s catchment area claiming that they are willing to drown to death than been denied their rightful claim for adequate rehabilitation for the lands they have lost. In the meanwhile, water level is increased gradually in the dam, that soon the water would submerge the protesters. The protest has entered the 10th day today.

The Narmada Valley Project, of which the Omkareshwar Dam is part of, is one of the most controversial development projects in the world, plagued with proven claims of adverse environmental impacts. [Source]

Super-Trawler threatened for its plans to pillage the ocean

The Tasmanian businessman behind the super trawler Margiris is playing down threats from environmental groups to stop his ship. Greenpeace failed to block the ship from docking in the South Australian fishing town of Port Lincoln last week. And over the weekend the Sea Shepherd society also said it would do anything it possibly could to stop the boat. [Hear an interview here]

Formal protest aim at stopping industrial solar plants from destroying public wild lands

Lush desert terrain provides habitat for many endangered species

Seeking to prevent massive and  irreversible environmental damage, numerous environmental groups have filed formal protests against the  Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States.  

“We want the public to know that several conservation groups are not planning to go down easily on the Interior Department’s plan to destroy up to 20 million acres of southwest deserts, not even including the wind projects,” Terry Weiner of the Desert Protective Council in San Diego told ECM. DPC is a co-founder of Solar Done Right, one of the environmental groups that filed a protest.

Concentrated solar destroys desert habitat

As of July 2012, eleven solar projects on over 36,000 acres had been approved on public lands. The projects range from 618 to 7,025 acres, with the average power plant exceeding 3,300 acres. As of July, pending proposals numbered 76, and would cover a total of 695,387 acres of public land. The scale, intensity, and pace of development on public lands are unprecedented.

Massive solar power plants will have irreversible, essentially permanent, impacts. The BLM admits that ecological recovery after public lands solar plants are decommissioned, if even possible, could take 3,000 years. [Source]

Climate activists drop banner on Olympics logo in London

Three people arrested after an environmental group dropped a banner on Tower Bridge have been released on bail. The bridge in south-east London was closed for over an hour on Saturday after the stunt by climate group Climate Siren.

City of London Police said a man and a woman were arrested on suspicion of causing criminal damage and a public nuisance. A man was arrested for assisting them.

The sign read Climate change, our next challenge and was placed over the famous bridge, which is currently adorned with the Paralympics Agitos logo. [Source]

Oglala Lakota Nation Women’s March and Day of Peace Lockdown

DGR Lockdown at the action

Women of the Oglala Lakota nation along with activists from Deep Green Resistance, AIM Grassroots, Native Youth Movement, Un-Occupy Albuquerque, Occupy Lincoln, and Rocky Mountain Peace and Justice Center took part in a march from Billy Mills Hall in Pine Ridge into White Clay to protest against the predatory liquor industry present there.

“For over 100 years the women of the Oglala Lakota nation have been dealing with an attack on the mind body and spirit of their relatives,” says Olowan Martinez who is a main organizer of the event and resident of Pine Ridge. “The Oglala have been silenced through chemical warfare waged by the corporations who are out to exploit and make a profit off of the suffering and misery of our people. The time has come to end this suffering by any means necessary.”

After the march and speeches members of Deep Green Resistance locked down and blockaded the road into White Clay.

Less than a half hour after the lockdown began a police officer rolled down their window and indiscriminately pepper sprayed into a crowd.   Up to 12 people were pepper sprayed including the 10 year old son of a Lakota woman who helped organize the march.  Also, an elder Lakota woman, Helen Red Feather, reported having her leg hit by a police car in motion.  Medics with the protest treated pepper spray injuries. Read full press release

Anti-capitalist student protests continue burning shit in Chile

Last week in Santiago between police and tens of thousand of demonstrators demanding education reform. The rally was one of the largest in recent weeks, with between 50,000 and 130,000 protestors, according to police and protest organizers.

While some danced to the rhythm of drums, thousands of others, masked and wearing hoods, followed the procession and attacked police with sticks and stones. The police responded, as they have in the past, with tear gas and water cannons.

Fire breathing Chileans in the streets!

The students were backed by members of the Unified Workers Federation, the country’s foremost union, which called on members to join the march. Public education in Chile suffered from sharp cuts in funding during the 1973-1990 dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet, leaving a system that favors expensive private schools that are out of the reach of the poor.

—————————————————

Vermin Supreme 2012 at the DNC.. Vote in an honest scumbag for a change. And don’t forget to brush your dam teeth!

“An Escalating Campaign Against Fossil Fuel Extraction Begins This April”

21 Mar

The largest industrial project on the face of the earth, Alberta, Canada’s Tar Sands (Photo originally posted here)

Occupy the Machine announces plan for actions on the Gulf Coast of Texas

The Occupy the Machine Coalition (OTM), born out of the newly-formed Deep Green Resistance network has called, has issued an Earth Day call to action “in honor of struggles against the extraction industry everywhere; in memory of the workers whose lives were taken by BP Two Years Ago,”

OTM has called for a festival of resistance and alternatives to the fossil fuel economy, in the shadow of the Houston Valero refinery, culminating in a refinery blockade on the dates of April 19th – 24th in Hartmann Park of the Manchester Neighborhood, Houston, Texas.

OTM says it chose the location because Keystone XL Pipeline will take oil from the Alberta Tar Sands, one of the most ecologically devastating projects on the face of the planet, to be refined by Valero and other companies in Houston. These refineries are surrounded by working-class neighborhoods throughout the Gulf, bringing cancer-causing toxins directly into their backyards. The majority of the Tar Sands oil processed in these refineries will be shipped overseas, ensuring that North American oil workers and those whose rights and lives have been uprooted by these companies won’t even see any long-term benefit for themselves.

Meanwhile, two years after the Deep Water Horizon explosion that killed 11 workers and devastated the communities of the Gulf, BP has had a record year of profits. BP has escaped justice yet again in its recent legal victory against the shrimpers and fishermen who they’ve put out of work and the families of the workers who died under their watch.

Valero Refinery, Houston, Texas (Photo by People's Freedom Caravan, 2007)

OTM, a coalition which includes area organizers, is inviting those who oppose the tar sands to build the power of our communities, amplify the voices of those most affected by companies like Valero, to blockade a refinery in the area. Friday, April 20th will be the beginning, with escalating blockades as necessary.

“Waves of support will be welcome and needed.”

Here’s how OTM’s call to action says you can participate:

“We need it all. There are as many levels of involvement and risk as there are individuals, affinity groups, and organizations willing to participate.

Not everyone will want to risk arrest by participating in the refinery blockade. That’s OK. However, many people are willing and able to take that risk. We appreciate all levels of commitment.

There will be room and plans for those who wish to cooperate with the police, and there will be room and plans for those who do not wish to cooperate with the police that wish to engage in jail solidarity tactics. Come prepared to tell us what you want to do Continue reading

If Deep Green Resistance & the Occupy movement merged…

28 Oct

Athens burns during general strike, Oct. 19 & 20, 2011

Reflections from Greece

By panagioti, Earth First! Journal editorial collective [read this article in Spanish here]

The recent “open letter” from Deep Green Resistance to participants of the Occupy movement may have come across as vague to those unfamiliar with the recent book and online network under the Deep Green Resistance (DGR) banner.

But those familiar with DGR, and its proposed strategy of Decisive Ecological Warfare, are likely imagining what it might really look like if there was more overlap between the DGR and Occupy folks. Would those engaging with the public through their full-time encampments around the world—of which there are 400+ in this directory—embrace a concurrent underground resistance effort along similar lines?

The DGR concept presented in their book references a couple dozen historical examples of popular movements doing just that—from the efforts that ended apartheid in South Africa to the local forces that whittled away at Nazi occupation across Europe in World War II.

Of course, there are efforts in the here-and-now doing the same thing around the world. But most of them are in less developed countries. One example is MEND, who has been fighting a guerilla resistance backed by popular support against Shell Oil and a corrupt government in the Niger Delta of Africa, the most polluted place on the planet. Their struggle has been covered by the Earth First! Journal in the past, and is also mentioned briefly in the DGR book.

Downtown Athens, in the “mother of all strikes”, Oct 20, 2011.

But another example, not in the book, is visible in Greece right now. In many ways, this is much closer to home for the Occupy world, since the current trend of public occupations was largely kicked off in Syntagma Square of Athens (and also in Spain), responding to the crisis manufactured by the European Union to manage the crumbling global economy by installing economic austerity measures in exchange for state bailouts. The best place to follow the struggle in english is here. But I digress… probably because I’m writing this from a bus pulling into Athens, ironically, on the eve of Oxi Day—a national holiday celebrating anti-fascist resistance in WWII. Back to the point at hand:

Nearly 3,000 people march down central Athens, Oct 1, 2011, in solidarity with the imprisoned members of EA (Revolutionary Struggle), Pola Roupa, Kostas Gournas and Nikos Maziotis, as well as those also persecuted for the same case Christoforos Kortesis, Sarantos Nikitopoulos, Vaggelis Stathopoulos, Marie Beracha and Kostas Katsenas, chanting “The States are the only terrorists! Solidarity with the guerrilla fighters!”

This week in Greece, the trial of Epanastatikos Agonas (EA) began, amidst general strikes and riots related to the austerity proposal this month. Members of EA (that’s “Revolutionary Struggle” in English) have taken responsibility for their participation in the group, which claimed dozens of actions against government and industry targets over the past several years. Their widespread support is visible all over the country in demonstrations, graffiti, posters and postings on dozens of websites.

While Occupy set up tents to make a point about banks being culprits of social and ecological ills, EA attacked the banks a bit more directly. In 2009 they attempted to blow up a Citibank headquarters in Athens. It didn’t work out, so they followed up by blowing up a branch of the bank instead. And when they were falsely accused of risking mass casualties, they refuted it with precision. That statement is worth a read if you are curious to get sense of where they are coming from.

EA member, Panagiota Roupa, makes public statement before trial

After several delays—coincidentally due to the general strikes—trial began October 24. The defendants opened with an articulation of why they do not recognize the legitimacy of the court, as an extension of the same system they are fighting. Their defense also includes a technical challenge on lacking evidence to link the individuals to the alleged crimes. Three of the accused have taken responsibility for involvement with the group, but have not confessed to the charges against them—which include accusations of terrorism (even though they have no charges related to actions targeting civilians.) The case is now on hold until November 1 and there is a pending request for European Court of Human Rights to oversee the basic procedural principles in trying the EA members for alleged crimes, not simply for their political affiliations.

There are several other groups and individuals in Greece who have also taken the path of underground resistance, with much aboveground support. Their legacy too is literally written on the walls, usually with spray paint. Some of them are household names, for example, the famous bank robber, Vassilis Paleokostas, who distributes liberated money into small villages and has escaped from prison multiple times, via helicopter assistance.

Solidarity march in France for the Il Silvestre 3

And there are other current examples, similar stories of underground resisters who choose to reject affiliations with conventional politics—as the Occupy has also thankfully done. But we usually only hear of their underground efforts in mainstream news when they get caught. Take the recent case of the Il Silvestre 3, who went to trial in Switzerland this summer. The individuals in this case, and the group they are involved with, are claimed to be responsible for many attacks against elite technology targets. They were sentenced to 3+ years in a Swiss prison, for an attempted attack on a nanotech laboratory being built by IBM. They will reportedly face additional time under Italy’s anti-terrorism laws—although, again, they did not target civilians.

But there are many more actions going underneath the radar of people who don’t read the dozens of communiqués posted online at sites like: Contra Info or 325. Take note on these sites, for every person arrested relating to underground activity, actions multiply announced in their honor.

While few of these groups embrace a strict policy relating to the use of violence, their actions tend to target property, not people. A statistic on the Earth Liberation Front (ELF) in the US comes to mind: in being associated with over 1,200 documented actions, totaling over $100 million in damages in 15+ years, not one injury has been killed. The ELF actually does have a policy against injuring people, and still the State prosecuted those arrested as terrorists.

Demonstrators and police fight over a tent during the Occupy Seattle protest at Westlake Park, where prominent labor leaders sent a “letter of solidarity” to Occupy Seattle: “On behalf of the Washington State Labor Council, AFL-CIO, and our 500 affiliated local unions and over 400,000 union women and men we want to express our solidarity with “Occupy Seattle” for standing up for and speaking out on behalf of the 99% who have victimized by corporate and political decisions that put the interests of corporate America and Wall Street before the people.” Photo: J. Trujillo/SEATTLEPI.COM

In a time when many groups are jumping on the Occupy bandwagon, including the Sierra Club (who issued a national statement of support for the movement, although they still technically have a policy against members engaging in civil disobedience), what direction will the public occupations take?

Let me be clear, I am not suggesting that the Occupy movement should have to make a choice between DGR and Sierra. It’s not an either/or scenario (at least not for me—I’m both a Sierra Club member and a suspect on the Joint Terrorism Task Force watch-list.) Really, it’s a challenge to see if we can ditch the horizontal hostility and move forward where we agree, as effectively as possible.

The real question of interest to me: Is there is actually a movement afoot capable of interjecting on the brink of ecological collapse and stopping the global economic system from simultaneously crushing what’s left of the planet’s biodiversity and humanity’s social freedom? If there is even a slight chance in hell that the answer is “yes.” Then let’s really go for it.

It seems few disagree these days, from Occupiers to Tea Partiers: corporations and governments both suck. We live under what is best described as a global dictatorship of the market. It’s a regime enforced by an expensive police state at home, military empire abroad. Its only a matter of time before these forces respond as they did this week in Oakland.

Over throwing the global economic system is just as relevant today as ending fascism or apartheid was in decades past. Unfortunately, the task of resistance movements today is quite a bit broader, as the targets are more widespread and amorphous; no doubt this is by design of the elite, the 1%. But it’s not impossible. It can’t be—after all, it’s infrastructure was built by us, the other 99% (give or take a few decimal points.)

So, what do you think? Is something to bring up for discussion at your next general assembly? Just remember your basic security culture protocols.

***

P.S. As I prepare to post this, the Greek government’s Oxi Day parade, featuring tanks and soldiers of the state who is repressing today’s resistance, is canceled by mass protests in the street’s of Thessaloniki; in Kalamata, there are reports of eggs being thrown at politicians in the parade...