Tag Archives: endangered

US Endangered Species Act Proposal Could End Most Primate Research

12 Jun

by James Gorman / New York Times

www.releasechimps.org

releasechimps.org

The United States Fish and Wildlife Service proposed Tuesday to bring captive chimpanzees under the protection of the Endangered Species Act, a move that would create one more major barrier to conducting invasive medical research on the animals for human diseases.

If the proposal is enacted, permits will be required for any experiment that harms chimps, and both public and privately financed researchers will have to show that the experiment contributes to the survival of chimps that remain in the wild. The recommendation is now open to public comment for 60 days.

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Wind Farm Allowed to Kill Endangered Birds

26 May

California-Condor_Wikipediaby Kelly Fuller / American Bird Conservancy

Washington, D.C., May 24, 2013 – Today the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) published the Record of Decision and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Biological Opinion for the Alta East Wind Project in California, which would for the first time allow a wind farm to kill an endangered California Condor without danger of prosecution. Fewer than 250 California Condors remain in the wild.

In response, American Bird Conservancy (ABC) is calling on the Department of the Interior to reverse the decision, charging that allowing the legal killing of one of the most imperiled birds in the United States threatens endangered species conservation efforts across the country.

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Will Lead Bullets Finally Kill Off the California Condor?

7 May

by Ted Williams, Cross Posted from Yale Environment 360

gallery_california_condor_profile

It was almost like watching wooly mammoths parting tusk-high savannah. In the gusty air above the Grand Canyon relicts from the Ice Age wheeled and dipped. Through my binoculars I could make out numbers on the wing tags of these California condors, North America’s largest and arguably most endangered bird.

By 1982 only 22 remained on the planet. Then in a decision that outraged a large element of the environmental community, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that all condors would be evacuated from the wild and bred in captivity. Friends of the Earth founder David Brower pled for “death with dignity.” But in 1993 the Peregrine Fund, a conservation organization, took on captive breeding, and the program proved a stunning success. After only three years, condor releases started in northern Arizona.

Today 234 birds are living in the wild (194 of them captive bred), but the prognosis for the species is scarcely brighter than in 1982; they’re being poisoned. When lead bullets strike bone they tend to splinter, impregnating meat and entrails with toxic fragments, any one of which can kill a condor. All manner of carrion-eating birds and mammals feast on the poisoned gut piles left when hunters field dress game.

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Federal Protections Lifted from Fish & Wildlife Service

27 Apr

by Rabb!t / Earth First! Newswire

fishandwildlife

National delisting of endangered species is on the rise, and flowing up the food chain. As was reported yesterday, the Fish & Wildlife Service has proposed lifting all Endangered Species Act protections from the critically endangered gray wolf. When state protections were lifted from this same species in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming, populations diminished rapidly as hunters flocked to the area to take the lives of these majestic beasts.

Now, yet another predator has been taken off the endangered species list. Recent studies have shown that United States Fish & Wildlife Service populations have reached hazardous levels, causing irreversible damage to their natural biosphere and destroying plant and animal populations at an unsustainable rate. Experts say that the organization’s levels of predation—which were tenuous to begin with—have escalated to such an extent that any protections bestowed upon them would be a danger to the North American continent and the human species as a whole. But it does not stop there. Evidence suggests that the Fish & Wildlife Service is only one small arm of a larger federal system, and that protection of any aspect of this system would be irresponsible and must be removed immediately.

Upon hearing the news, gray wolf populations released a communique declaring open season on all federal agencies.

Idaho AG Asked to Investigate Controversial Trapping Photos

4 Apr

Nez Perce National Forest employee Josh Bransford poses with a wolf trapped in north Idaho

Grisly images, depicting a badly injured wolf captured in north Idaho, have gone viral. Posing alongside the animal is a grinning Josh Bransford, an employee of the Nez Perce National Forest. The pictures, which surfaced on the Web in March, continue to stir fierce debate over an already-emotional topic. And now, some environmental groups are asking for a formal investigation into possible animal cruelty.

The Moscow-based Friends of the Clearwater and the Portland-based Center for Biological Diversity have banded together to ask Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Forest Service to look into the incident and the images.

The pictures were reportedly posted to the website trapperman.com. An accompanying description indicates that the wolf was trapped and shot by someone other than Bransford.

“The egregious torture of a wolf needs to be investigated by Idaho’s attorney general and the Forest Service,” said Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity. “And Josh Bransford should be fined or dismissed from his position.”

To read full article go to source as cross-posted from here

Another image connected to article:

100 Groups Ask EPA to End Wildlife Poisoning From Lead Hunting Ammunition

13 Mar

Lead Kills Millions of Birds, Including Eagles, Condors, and Hurts Human Health


WASHINGTON- One hundred organizations in 35 states today formally petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate toxic lead in hunting ammunition to protect public health and prevent the widespread poisoning of eagles, California condors and other wildlife. Up to 20 million birds die each year from lead poisoning after consuming spent lead shot and bullet fragments left in the wild from hunting.

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Gray Wolf to be de-listed from endangered species list in Montana, Idaho

12 Apr

The budget deal that will be voted on this week to avoid a government shutdown may cost lives. The lives of gray wolves, that is.

A rider that will be included in the budget package to authorize the states of Montana and Idaho to remove the gray wolf from its protected listing under the Endangered Species Act.

Wolf “de-listing” has been a hot issue in the northern Rockies as wolves threaten livestock with population expansion. Washington lobbyists for the effort include former Idaho Republican Sen. Larry Craig.

The rider in current form authorizes de-listing for Idaho and Montana, but Wyoming may be added before the legislation before it is voted on. The rider was authored by Montana Democratic Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester and by Idaho Republican Rep. Mike Simpson.

Wyoming Republican Rep. Cynthia Lummis also advocates for de-listing. It is far from certain that Wyoming would be included, as the state has held up previous de-listing efforts by Idaho and Montana.