Tag Archives: mexico

Indigenous Resistors to Wind Farm Project in Mexico Facing Violent Threats

4 Sep

???????????????????????????????from CODIGODH

The Gobixha Committee for the Integral Defense of Human Rights (CODIGO DH) would like to express concern for the lack of institutional attention to the conflict generated by the construction of the wind farm Strength and Energy Bií Hioxo, owned by the Gas Natural Fenosa (GNF) Company. This situation has generated a wave of violence against supporters of the Popular Assembly of the People of Juchitán (APPJ). We are concerned about the indifference of the authorities and their lack of action during the last eight months.

The last act of violence against members of the APPJ took place on Sunday, August 25, when they where attacked by gunshots at the summit of the place named Chigueeze, inside the area of the Bií Hioxo park. These actions took place approximately at noon when APPJ members were walking on communal lands to document the effects of the wind farm project. At this time they were stopped by armed men in a white suburban who threatened them with death, took their pictures, and shot at them. The men briefly held Sara Lopez prisoner and tried to stab her, but she was defended by the people who were with her, and was able to escape. The armed men also tried to run over another person with their vehicle.

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Sonora, Mex. Bans Bullfighting, a First for the Country

8 May
cruel-bull-fight
By Phyllis M. Daugherty
Sonora has become the first Mexican state to ban bullfighting, recently passing the long-awaited Animal Protection Law addressing cruelty to animals.

In a statement on Formato 21 radio, Perez Rubio hailed the unanimous vote on May 2 by the legislature of Mexico’s northwestern border state. Continue reading

Indigenous Town in Mexico Celebrates Two Years of Autonomy and Defense of their Community Forest

24 Apr

Cross Posted from Real News Network via Climate-Connections

By Andalusia Knoll, April 23 2013. 

[See previous EF! Newswire coverage of the Purepecha struggle for autonomy and ecology in Michoacan, Mexico.]

After two years of resisting illegal logging and organized crime, indigenous people in the town of Chéran Mexico demand justice for their assassinated community members and respect for their autonomous government.

PEMEX Explosion: 33 Dead, 121 Injured In Mexico Oil Company Blast

2 Feb

 

pemex explosion

By Mark Stevenson and Michael Weissenstein/ Huffington Post

MEXICO CITY — A blast that collapsed the lower floors of a building in the headquarters of Mexico’s state-owned oil company, crushing at least 33 people beneath tons of rubble and injuring 121, is being looked at as an accident although all lines of investigation remain open, the head of Petroleos Mexicanos said Friday.

As hundreds of emergency workers dug through the rubble, the company’s worst disaster in a decade was fueling debate about the state of Pemex, a vital source of government revenue that is suffering from decades of underinvestment and has been hit by a recent series of accidents that have tarnished its otherwise improving safety record.

Until now, virtually all the accidents had hit its petroleum infrastructure, not its office buildings.

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Community defeats giant cement company in Mexico

25 Sep

CEMEX opponents from Hidalgo

CEMEX cannot burn more waste in the state of Hidalgo

In a statement released yesterday by GAIA, the Huichapan community, in the central México’s state of Hidalgo, has achieved a historic victory, after 6 months of protests and legal actions that drove to the closure of the plant of Proambiente company, a subsidiary of Cementos Mexicanos, CEMEX, by the Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources.

This plant was responsible for receiving and processing a large part of the 12,000 tons of solid waste generated daily in Mexico City, to be burned as an alternative fuel in the kilns of CEMEX plant in Huichapan.

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Fronteras y Cuerpos (Borders and Bodies)

28 Jun

por Russ McSpadden / arte por Jill Lavetsky

for the English version click here

En algún lugar en las afueras del viejo pueblo minero de Ruby -no es nada más que un pueblo fantasma- y no tan lejos de la frontera Arizona/México, corrimos detrás un grupo de migrantes. Ellos se movían rápido atravesando el cañón que cruza San Luis y las Montañas Atascosa. Eran jóvenes, mayormente mujeres, y estaban nerviosos. Les ofrecimos agua, comida, con algunas palabras en español, y el guía me ofreció agua y comida, en inglés. Él estaba inseguro de mis intenciones. Yo expliqué que vimos a la migra por la carretera de Ruby y luego nos despedimos – good luck, buena suerte. Ayudando en la lavada de ropa vi que el grupo se detuvo a recoger unos calcetines que habían dejado en una cubeta. Un par de calcetines viejos manchados de sangre se quedaron colgados en un árbol de manzanita.

Una semana antes, un buen amigo formó parte de un equipo humanitario que encontró el cuerpo de una mujer joven, quien había fallecido unas horas antes en medio del desierto abierto a un par de millas de Ruby. Se supone que el grupo de ella fue dispersado por la Patrulla Fronteriza por helicópteros, por drone (aviones piloteados a control remoto) o hombres a caballo, y ella se perdió a causa del pánico y se desvió hacia la sección del Parque Nacional Coronado para morirse de sed. A través de un contacto, mi amigo se enteró que la mujer estaba buscando a su esposo y a su hijo en Texas. Su esposo lloró al teléfono cuando se enteró de las noticias.

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This Camera Fights Fascism: Photographs of migration and struggle

22 Sep

Photo by David Bacon, Strikers at the D'Arrigo Brothers produce, 1998

Art Exhibit: de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University, California. Opening Thursday, September 22nd, 6PM.

David Bacon and Francisco Dominguez have both followed in the tradition of Depression-era photographers such as Dorothea Lange, focusing their cameras on struggle, dissent, immigrants, and workers. Their photographs speak to the global character of contemporary migration. Like the so-called Okies of the Depression, many of today’s migrants have been displaced by environmental degradation and wider economic forces.

The title of this exhibition refers to a sign that 1930s folk musician Woody Guthrie often had on his guitar, “This Machine Kills Fascists.” These two photographers build a powerful body of visual evidence of the continuing struggle of workers, migrants, and poor people to survive. In this exhibition the photographers responded to images by Dorothea Lange and selected photographs from their own work that draw close connections between the 1930s and today.

David Bacon is a photojournalist who has documented the movements of farm workers, social protest from Iraq and Mexico to the U.S., and the migration of people. He is the author of several books, and many of the images in this show are from Communities Without Borders, Images and Words from the World of Migration.

Francisco Dominguez is a photographer and printmaker. His parents both were farm workers. He documents the struggles of indigenous, immigrant, and poor people in black and white photography.

Click here to view the slide show

Explosive package sent with message to the Head of Nanotechnology Engineering, Universidad Politécnica, Mexico

7 May

On April 19, news sources in Mexico reported a bomb exploding at Universidad Politécnica in Valle de Mexico, located in the vicinity of the town of Tultitlan (in the neighborhood of Villa Esmeralda), on the border with Izcalli. While El Universal initially reported an accidental injury to a worker at the campus, El Sol de México later reported there were “no injuries or material damage.”

Both news sources claimed that it was unknown who could be the perpetrators of the blasts, and according to El Sol, “It is suspected that the authors may be students pranksters.”

Several blog entries posted later that month suggest that the author may have had another motivation. A communique claimed by “Individualists tending toward the wild,” dated April 14, 2011, begins with this line: “If you think that I am a pessimist, then you have not understood anything.” It continues on with a thorough explanation of why the head of the Engineering Division in Nanotechnology, Prof. Oscar Alberto Camacho Olguin, was the chosen target of this explosive:

“…In recent years there has been significant progress in American countries like the United States, Canada, Brazil and also Mexico, where there has been an accumulation of domestic and foreign capital for the creation of nano-scale technology.

Nanotechnology is the furthest advancement that may yet exist in the history of anthropocentric progress. It consists in the total study, the scrutiny into the manipulation and domination of all the smallest elements, invisible to human eyes. With this humans have managed to control everything, absolutely everything, from changes in the climate to the smallest atomic molecule. Civilization, aside from threatening our freedom as Individuals, the freedom of the Animals and of the Earth, now passes its threat even to the scale of less than a micrometer.

National institutions and corporations that conduct rigorous studies and research for the commercial development of Nano-bio-science are varied; they range from the Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo (IMP) with the help of Pemex and CFE, the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UNAM), Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana (UAM), Universidad Iberoamericana, the Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica (among others) with its Environmental Nanotechnology University Project; Glaxo SmithKline, Unilever, Syngenta, among others.

This type of technology is growing, the branches that it has encompassed can scarcely be counted (medicine, military, cosmetology, petrochemistry, nuclear, electro-informatics) but these are just the beginnings of what it can encompass…”

By the end, the author of the communique seems to get a bit depressed. But it finishes off with the sort of zeal that only the deepest of eco-nihilists can manifest. Uncle Ted? Is that you?!?

“…And although all this is useless and futile, we prefer to be defeated in a war against total domination than to remain inert, waiting, passive, or as part of all this. We prefer to position ourselves on the side of Wild Fauna and Flora that remain. We prefer to return to nature, respect her absolutely, and abandon the cities to maintain our claims as Anti-civilization Warriors. We prefer to continue the War that we have declared years ago, knowing that we will lose, but promising ourselves that we will give our greatest effort. Because although some elements within Civilization tell us that we have been domesticated for years biologically, we nevertheless continue to have Wild Instincts that we hurl in defense of the whole of which we are a part—the Earth.”

The entire translated communique can be found here. Or in Spanish here.

Geronimo’s Name Used in bin Laden Operation an Insult to Indigenous Resistance

6 May

The code name “Geronimo”, used during the US navy seals special operation that resulted in the reported death of Usama bin Laden, references the 19th-century Chiracahua Apache who spent his life fighting the encroachment of the states of Mexico and the US. into indigenous territory.

Geronimo (right) with a group of Apache in northern Mexico in 1886

Despite valiant bravery against the well armed militarys’ of the two imperialist nations, Geronimo was eventually captured by US forces in 1886. He and other Apache captives were transported as prisoners to Fort Pickens, in Pensacola, Florida, and his family was sent to Fort Marion in St. Augustine, Florida. Geronimo died, unable to return to his homeland, in 1909.

Upon hearing the use of Geronimo’s name as the code word for Usama bin Laden, several Native American activist groups have voiced their outrage.

The Navy Seals who killed bin Laden dispatched this message soon after: “Geronimo E-KIA.” E stands for enemy.

Time magazine reported the use of Geronimo’s name in the operation as follows:

The President sat stone-faced through much of the events. Several of his aides, however, were pacing. For long periods of time, nobody said a thing, as everyone waited for the next update. … So when word came that a helicopter had been grounded, a sign that the plan was already off course, the tension increased.

Minutes later, more word came over the transom. “Visual on Geronimo,” said a disembodied voice, using the agreed-upon code name for America’s most wanted enemy, Osama bin Laden. Word then came that Geronimo had been killed. Only when the last helicopter lifted off some minutes later did the President know that his forces had sustained no casualties.

According to CIA Director Leon Panetta:

Once those teams went into the compound, I can tell you that there was a time period of almost 20 or 25 minutes where we — you know, we really didn’t know just exactly what was going on. And there were some very tense moments as we were waiting for information. But finally, Adm. McRaven came back and said that he had picked up the word “Geronimo,” which was the code word that represented that they got bin Laden.

Comparing the legendary Apache leader to a terrorist and enemy of the United States was deeply insulting and did real damage to Native Americans of all ages, said Suzan Shown Harjo to the Associated Press. She is president of the Morning Star Institute, a Washington-based Native rights organization.

“It is shocking, really shocking, that this happened,” said Harjo, a member of the Cheyenne & Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma.

“Our names are stolen and then we’re renamed in order to control us, frankly,” she told the Senate Indian Affairs Committee.

In a post in Indian Country Lise Baik King described the use of the name Geronimo as an attack on Native America.

Geronimo as a U.S. prisoner in 1905

The “bin Laden is dead” news story will make thousands of impressions on the minds of people around the globe, and the name Geronimo will now be irrevocably linked with the world’s most reviled terrorist.

Potentially the most disturbing fact is what this says to American Indian children. It equates being Native American with being hated, an enemy to the world, and someone to be hunted down and killed, and re-casts one of their heroes into a villainous role.

Time Magazine’s Swampland blog first reported the details yesterday that the target, Osama bin Laden, was code-named Geronimo, in keeping with The White House’s afternoon press conference.

But the story coming from the White House evolved by evening, with what appears to be a “re-tooling” of the message, which now states that the “mission” was code-named Geronimo.

The CNN White House blog featured a historic black and white photo of Geronimo and the headline, “Osama bin Laden codename “Geronimo”, for the duration of the afternoon at whitehouse.blogs.cnn.com. There is currently a post with the title “Osama bin Laden mission codename ‘Geronimo” (emphasis added) with a timestamp of 4:46 PM, though some commenters express outrage over the earlier title.

Tribal members from around the country are turning to social networking sites Facebook and Twitter as an outlet to express their anger and sadness at the unwelcome association. “This sucks,” said Harold Monteau, an attorney and tribal member from Rocky Boy, Montana, “A lot of people are angry about the obvious stereotypes it implies.”

“It’s another attempt to label Native Americans as terrorists,” said Paula Antoine from the Rosebud Sioux Tribe in South Dakota. Beaver North Cloud, a JemezPueblo tribal member from Albuquerque, New Mexico expressed her frustration, saying “Damn it!!!!! Why am I not surprised, yet so disappointed beyond words.”

And someone is already selling the stupid t-shirts: