Tag Archives: mexico

Indigenous Resistors to Wind Farm Project in Mexico Facing Violent Threats

4 Sep

???????????????????????????????from CODIGODH

The Gobixha Committee for the Integral Defense of Human Rights (CODIGO DH) would like to express concern for the lack of institutional attention to the conflict generated by the construction of the wind farm Strength and Energy Bií Hioxo, owned by the Gas Natural Fenosa (GNF) Company. This situation has generated a wave of violence against supporters of the Popular Assembly of the People of Juchitán (APPJ). We are concerned about the indifference of the authorities and their lack of action during the last eight months.

The last act of violence against members of the APPJ took place on Sunday, August 25, when they where attacked by gunshots at the summit of the place named Chigueeze, inside the area of the Bií Hioxo park. These actions took place approximately at noon when APPJ members were walking on communal lands to document the effects of the wind farm project. At this time they were stopped by armed men in a white suburban who threatened them with death, took their pictures, and shot at them. The men briefly held Sara Lopez prisoner and tried to stab her, but she was defended by the people who were with her, and was able to escape. The armed men also tried to run over another person with their vehicle.

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Sonora, Mex. Bans Bullfighting, a First for the Country

8 May
cruel-bull-fight
By Phyllis M. Daugherty
Sonora has become the first Mexican state to ban bullfighting, recently passing the long-awaited Animal Protection Law addressing cruelty to animals.

In a statement on Formato 21 radio, Perez Rubio hailed the unanimous vote on May 2 by the legislature of Mexico’s northwestern border state. Continue reading

Indigenous Town in Mexico Celebrates Two Years of Autonomy and Defense of their Community Forest

24 Apr

Cross Posted from Real News Network via Climate-Connections

By Andalusia Knoll, April 23 2013. 

[See previous EF! Newswire coverage of the Purepecha struggle for autonomy and ecology in Michoacan, Mexico.]

After two years of resisting illegal logging and organized crime, indigenous people in the town of Chéran Mexico demand justice for their assassinated community members and respect for their autonomous government.

PEMEX Explosion: 33 Dead, 121 Injured In Mexico Oil Company Blast

2 Feb

 

pemex explosion

By Mark Stevenson and Michael Weissenstein/ Huffington Post

MEXICO CITY — A blast that collapsed the lower floors of a building in the headquarters of Mexico’s state-owned oil company, crushing at least 33 people beneath tons of rubble and injuring 121, is being looked at as an accident although all lines of investigation remain open, the head of Petroleos Mexicanos said Friday.

As hundreds of emergency workers dug through the rubble, the company’s worst disaster in a decade was fueling debate about the state of Pemex, a vital source of government revenue that is suffering from decades of underinvestment and has been hit by a recent series of accidents that have tarnished its otherwise improving safety record.

Until now, virtually all the accidents had hit its petroleum infrastructure, not its office buildings.

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Community defeats giant cement company in Mexico

25 Sep

CEMEX opponents from Hidalgo

CEMEX cannot burn more waste in the state of Hidalgo

In a statement released yesterday by GAIA, the Huichapan community, in the central México’s state of Hidalgo, has achieved a historic victory, after 6 months of protests and legal actions that drove to the closure of the plant of Proambiente company, a subsidiary of Cementos Mexicanos, CEMEX, by the Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources.

This plant was responsible for receiving and processing a large part of the 12,000 tons of solid waste generated daily in Mexico City, to be burned as an alternative fuel in the kilns of CEMEX plant in Huichapan.

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Fronteras y Cuerpos (Borders and Bodies)

28 Jun

por Russ McSpadden / arte por Jill Lavetsky

for the English version click here

En algún lugar en las afueras del viejo pueblo minero de Ruby -no es nada más que un pueblo fantasma- y no tan lejos de la frontera Arizona/México, corrimos detrás un grupo de migrantes. Ellos se movían rápido atravesando el cañón que cruza San Luis y las Montañas Atascosa. Eran jóvenes, mayormente mujeres, y estaban nerviosos. Les ofrecimos agua, comida, con algunas palabras en español, y el guía me ofreció agua y comida, en inglés. Él estaba inseguro de mis intenciones. Yo expliqué que vimos a la migra por la carretera de Ruby y luego nos despedimos – good luck, buena suerte. Ayudando en la lavada de ropa vi que el grupo se detuvo a recoger unos calcetines que habían dejado en una cubeta. Un par de calcetines viejos manchados de sangre se quedaron colgados en un árbol de manzanita.

Una semana antes, un buen amigo formó parte de un equipo humanitario que encontró el cuerpo de una mujer joven, quien había fallecido unas horas antes en medio del desierto abierto a un par de millas de Ruby. Se supone que el grupo de ella fue dispersado por la Patrulla Fronteriza por helicópteros, por drone (aviones piloteados a control remoto) o hombres a caballo, y ella se perdió a causa del pánico y se desvió hacia la sección del Parque Nacional Coronado para morirse de sed. A través de un contacto, mi amigo se enteró que la mujer estaba buscando a su esposo y a su hijo en Texas. Su esposo lloró al teléfono cuando se enteró de las noticias.

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This Camera Fights Fascism: Photographs of migration and struggle

22 Sep

Photo by David Bacon, Strikers at the D'Arrigo Brothers produce, 1998

Art Exhibit: de Saisset Museum at Santa Clara University, California. Opening Thursday, September 22nd, 6PM.

David Bacon and Francisco Dominguez have both followed in the tradition of Depression-era photographers such as Dorothea Lange, focusing their cameras on struggle, dissent, immigrants, and workers. Their photographs speak to the global character of contemporary migration. Like the so-called Okies of the Depression, many of today’s migrants have been displaced by environmental degradation and wider economic forces.

The title of this exhibition refers to a sign that 1930s folk musician Woody Guthrie often had on his guitar, “This Machine Kills Fascists.” These two photographers build a powerful body of visual evidence of the continuing struggle of workers, migrants, and poor people to survive. In this exhibition the photographers responded to images by Dorothea Lange and selected photographs from their own work that draw close connections between the 1930s and today.

David Bacon is a photojournalist who has documented the movements of farm workers, social protest from Iraq and Mexico to the U.S., and the migration of people. He is the author of several books, and many of the images in this show are from Communities Without Borders, Images and Words from the World of Migration.

Francisco Dominguez is a photographer and printmaker. His parents both were farm workers. He documents the struggles of indigenous, immigrant, and poor people in black and white photography.

Click here to view the slide show