Tag Archives: nanotechnology

The Early History of the Robot Wars, Part 1

13 Dec

IN THIS EPISODE: WTF In the Eyeball, Sexy Surveillance Mannequins and Other Shit Escaping the Constraints of Biology

by Russ McSpadden / Carbon-based humanoid Science and Technology correspondent

[The text of this work is free to share and distribute under the following Creative Commons License CC-BY-ND 3.0]

WTF In The Eyeball?wtf_int_the_eyeball

Researchers at Ghent University in England have developed a new break through technology that promises to make your near future far more annoying — and especially more boring — than any dystopic science-fiction novel you’ve read. In one giant stupid leap in cyborg technology the team created a curved LCD contact lens that can display text messages. Let’s hope they developed new eye drops to ease the discomfort from all those winking emoticons and raunchy sexts, too.  But I guess this’ll solve that 21st century dilemma of needing to maintain eye contact with the person you are talking to while also texting someone else.

According to chief researcher, Herbert De Smet, at the university’s Centre of Microsystems Technology, it’s “not science-fiction” but the first step towards “fully pixilated contact lens displays,” which will one day, with any luck, allow you to watch Gangnam Style in the comfort of your own, um, pupil.

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More bomb attacks against nanotechnology in Mexico

17 Aug

The same group who took credit for anti-technology bombing in April, which news sources in Mexico reported exploding at Universidad Politécnica in Valle de Mexico, has claimed more attacks.

According to Time Magazine, “An anti-technology group… was responsible for a package bomb that injured two university professors just outside Mexico City, a state prosecutor said Tuesday [August 9, 2011]. Mexico’s Attorney General’s Office announced that a suspicious envelope presumbly containing explosives was found at Mexico’s National Polytechnical Institute on Tuesday, though it didn’t detonate. The office has opened investigations into both incidents.”

The Time article claims the groups is calling itself ‘Individuals Tending to Savagery’, although a translator’s note on the anarchist blog War On Society, which posted a translation of the communique, uses the name ‘Individualists Tending Towards the Wild’ and explains: “The group’s name, Individualidades tendiendo a lo Salvaje [ITS]… more literally means ‘individualities,’ and salvaje more literally means ‘savage’… having more of the connotations of barbarous undomesticated wildness than pure pristine wilderness, and without as much racist connotation as the English ‘savage’ has.”

As with the April communique, ITS is again a bit wordy, with plenty of footnotes, ala Ted Kaczynski. Here are some excerpts: “But what’s wrong with creating solar energy through modified nanoparticles? some will say. ITS answer: When these modified viruses affect the way we develop as the result of a nanobacteriological war, by some laboratory error, or by the explosion of nanocontamination that compromises the air, food, transportation, water, in short, the entire world, then they will realize, all those who defend nanotechnology and cannot find an apparent threat, that it was a grave mistake to leave it to grow at their leisure.”

“Among the projects at the mentioned university campus are the Center for Business Development and Transference of Technology, CEDETEC, which is part of a futuristic philosophy called Mission 2015, which is committed to developing research and technology relevant to nanobioindustrial progress for the country in different areas… CEDETEC is a place where the efforts of companies, the State, and the university merge, and which aims to promote job creation, attraction of capital, and growth of technology companies and to increase value for the academy.”

“…It is logical we will continue with these acts, and other scientists and the rest of technoswillology [the original ‘tecnobazofia’ more seamlessly combines two words meaning ‘technology’ and ‘pigswill’ or ‘hogwash’ – transl.] must pay the consequences of their actions…”

Letter Bomb Explodes at Swiss Nuclear Industry Office

3 Apr

March, 2011 cover of radical ecological Italian magazine Terra Selvaggia, attributed to the eco-anarchist group Il Silvestre


A letter bomb exploded at the offices of Swissnuclear in the northern town of Olten a spokesperson for the Swiss police said. “At about 8.15 am, while opening the letter, it exploded,” and injured two people.

A statement from the Italian Informal Anarchist Federation was found in the remains of the boobytrapped letter, Swiss federal prosecutor Carlo Bulletti said, quoted by the Swiss news agency ATS on Friday.

Authorities said the letter written in Italian was postmarked from abroad and referred to three eco-anarchists, Costantino Ragusa, Silvia Guerini, and Luca Bernasconi, connected with the group Il Silvestre detained in Switzerland in connection with an attempted bombing at the Swiss headquarters of IBM in Zurich. Il Silvestre opposes nanotechnology, biotechnology, the state and the military and publishes the magazine Terra Selvaggia.

On the same day, an Italian military officer was injured in an army barracks in the Italian port of Livorno by a letter bomb apparently sent by the same anarchist group.

The FAI has also claimed responsibility for a letter bomb sent to a Greek top security prison where a number of anarchists are incarcerated, Greek police said on Friday.

Thursday’s incident occurred near a Greenpeace demonstration outside the headquarters of Swiss power firm Alpiq, not far from the Swissnuclear office.

The group cancelled its demonstration following the explosion, distancing itself from the action.

“We distance ourselves with the greatest firmness from this explosion. Greenpeace has nothing to do with this attack,” Florian Kasser, who heads Greenpeace’s energy campaign in Switzerland, told AFP.

In a statement, Greenpeace said the demonstration was being held to demand Alpiq formally withdraw a request to build new nuclear power plants in Switzerland, which has suspended plans to replace its ageing reactors following Japan’s nuclear disaster.

In an interview with a Swiss newspaper, Heinz Karrer, who heads Swiss energy group Axpo, acknowledged that “at the moment, it is unthinkable to talk about another new nuclear power plant.”