Tag Archives: wolves

A New Year for the Earth First! Journal

12 Jan

EF fund_letter_2013 image_Page_1By now, all you current and former subscribers to the EF! Journal should have seen our 2013 Winter update letter in the mail. For those who have sent back donations, we offer our full gratitude for your commitment to sustaining the media of the eco-resistance.

For those still sitting on the letters twiddling your thumbs, we ask that if you can afford a donation of any amount, please get them in the mail to us soon, before they are totally buried under the mounds of junk mail from whack NGOs with their glossy polar bear pictures who are trying to capitalize off your christmas gift money…

And for those who didn’t see it in the mail, you can subscribe to the Journal right here and now, so you’ll never miss another riveting letter from us again. In the meantime, the text from the letter is below. Also, you can print out the whole thing to make copies and give ’em to all your friends by clicking on the image to the right.

Yule Season’s Greetings To All You Eco-Defenders
And Earth First! Journal Supporters

It’s been a long, hard year here at the Earth First! Journal office. Despite financial pressures in conjunction with lots of court dates, once again, we have persisted.

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Large Predators Moving to the City: Urban Coyotes on the Rise

6 Oct

A coyote (without a metrocard!) takes a ride on a light rail train in Portland, Oregon, in 2002.

The world is undergoing the largest wave of urban growth in history. In 2008, for the first time in history, more than half of the world’s human population will be living in towns and cities.

Many new Urbanites have long, furry muzzles, piercing, yellow eyes and are very, very wily. They’re coyotes.

Until recently, scientists who study wildlife thought coyotes couldn’t live in heavily populated areas. Wild carnivorous animals and humans don’t typically mix. But, as previously reported, those scientists were proven wrong. There have been coyote sightings in dozens of U.S. cities — Chicago, Portland, Seattle, even New York City. Like the fox, the skunk and the raccoon before it, the coyote is the latest predatory animal to make the city its home.

The animal’s presence in urban areas is an early indicator for what is to come: larger predators like wolves, mountain lions, and bears. Continue reading

Revenge of the Wolves

19 Sep

Illustration by Vin Paneccasio

Delisted and targeted in Wyoming, wolves attack hunters

from the Daily Maul

WYOMING, IN THE NOT-TOO-DISTANT FUTURE — Hundreds of hunters are dead this morning after wolves launched a preemptive strike on their would-be human attackers.

“We’re taking the fight to the terrorists who want to destroy our way of life,” a gray wolf named David told The Daily Maul.

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Howls of Reprisal: Wolves Return to the Frontlines

17 May

Until their reintroduction in the 1990s wolves were all but wiped out in the Northern Rocky Mountains. No wolves had been spotted in Eastern Oregon since 1946, and further west, the last sighting of a wolf in California was in 1924. 

The formation and spread of the Imnaha wolfpack in Eastern Oregon, however, has returned the apex predators’ howls to the Northwest.  Following the birth of wolfpups in 2010 in the Imnaha region of Oregon, a lone wolf, tagged as OR-7 by Oregon Fish and Wildlife, and Journey, by Oregon school children, wandered over a thousand miles into Northern California in late 2011 with the hope of a wilder future for us all.

But starting in 2012 wolves have been delisted in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming and are well on their way to being legally hunted in the Great Lakes Region further East. The demonization of wolves by ranchers and other interests has already lead to the murder of at least one wolf in Oregon. In California, anti-wolf alliances are already forming should a pack form there.

for more information and analysis on the Imnaha wolfpack and the wolf wars in Oregon read The Howls of Reprisal: Wolf Defense in Oregon by Portland Animal Defense League, printed in the Brigid 2012 issue of the Earth First! Journal.

New Wyoming wolf plan would allow killing of hundreds of wolves

30 Apr

From the Center for Biological Diversity

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that Wyoming has passed legislation and an amendment to its wolf-management plan that will meet federal approval and trigger removal of Endangered Species Act protections for gray wolves in the state.

The new law and plan — to take effect later this year when wolves are removed from the federal endangered species list — increase the area of Wyoming where wolves would be designated “predators” and could be killed without limit; they also keep in place a “trophy game management area,” where hunting will be allowed to dramatically reduce wolf populations.

“Wyoming’s wolf-management plan is a recipe for wolf slaughter that will only serve to incite more of the prejudice against wolves that led to their destruction in the first place,” said Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity, which has been working for two decades to save and recover wolves throughout the West. “Removal of federal protections for wolves has been a disaster in Idaho and Montana and will be even worse in Wyoming.”

While wolves would remain fully protected within Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks, elsewhere in Wyoming they would be subject to shooting, trapping and snaring, including 83 percent of the state where they will be considered “predators” and there will be no limits on their killing. The remaining portion of the state would be considered a “trophy game management area,” where killing wolves would be permitted, with the goal of reducing the population from approximately 29 packs to around 10.

“Along with the killing of wolves in Idaho and Montana, which had their protection taken away last year through a back-door congressional rider, this planned persecution of wolves in Wyoming could be devastating to the beautiful animals’ survival in the northern Rocky Mountains,” said Robinson. “Killing most of Wyoming’s wolves will hurt wolves in Colorado, too, where they’re only starting to return by way of Wyoming.”

Since wolf hunting and trapping seasons opened last fall, 378 wolves have been killed in Idaho, which has no cap on killing and several ongoing open seasons. An additional 166 wolves were killed in Montana, which has now closed its season. Contrary to promises, hunting and trapping have appeared to inflame anti-wolf sentiment, with comments and pictures appearing on the Internet that boast of wolf killing and call for more slaughter.

The Fish and Wildlife Service has reopened a two-week comment period, during which feedback is sought from the public before the agency finalizes the delisting rule.

Background
In October 2011 the Obama administration announced finalization of an agreement between the Fish and Wildlife Service and Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead whereby the agency would remove wolves in Wyoming from the federal endangered species list and the state would only be required to keep alive 100 wolves or 10 breeding pairs outside Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks (which together provide habitat for a few dozen wolves that would remain protected while in the parks).

After pups are born within the next few weeks, it is likely that more than 500 wolves will live outside the national parks in Wyoming. The state plan will allow their unregulated killing throughout most of the state.

The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 350,000 members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

Idaho AG Asked to Investigate Controversial Trapping Photos

4 Apr

Nez Perce National Forest employee Josh Bransford poses with a wolf trapped in north Idaho

Grisly images, depicting a badly injured wolf captured in north Idaho, have gone viral. Posing alongside the animal is a grinning Josh Bransford, an employee of the Nez Perce National Forest. The pictures, which surfaced on the Web in March, continue to stir fierce debate over an already-emotional topic. And now, some environmental groups are asking for a formal investigation into possible animal cruelty.

The Moscow-based Friends of the Clearwater and the Portland-based Center for Biological Diversity have banded together to ask Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the U.S. Forest Service to look into the incident and the images.

The pictures were reportedly posted to the website trapperman.com. An accompanying description indicates that the wolf was trapped and shot by someone other than Bransford.

“The egregious torture of a wolf needs to be investigated by Idaho’s attorney general and the Forest Service,” said Michael Robinson of the Center for Biological Diversity. “And Josh Bransford should be fined or dismissed from his position.”

To read full article go to source as cross-posted from here

Another image connected to article:

Grey Wolf Hunts In Northern Rockies To Continue, Rules Federal Appeals Court

15 Mar

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Wednesday rejected a lawsuit from conservation groups that want to block wolf hunts that have killed more than 500 of the predators across the Northern Rockies in recent months.

The ruling from a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said Congress had the right to intervene when it stripped protections from wolves last spring.

Lawmakers stepped in after court rulings kept wolves on the endangered list for years after they reached recovery goals. Wildlife advocates claimed in their lawsuit that Congress violated the separation of powers by interfering with the courts.

But in an opinion authored by Judge Mary Schroeder, the court said Congress was within its rights, and that lawmakers had appropriately amended the Endangered Species Act to deal with Northern Rockies wolves.

That amendment marked the first time Congress has forcibly removed a species’ endangered status. It was tacked onto a federal budget bill by Idaho Republican Rep. Mike Simpson and Montana Democratic Sen. Jon Tester.

“This case has made it clear that those who persist in trying to manage wildlife through the courts, in spite of all scientific evidence that this species has recovered, no longer have a defensible position,” Simpson said Wednesday.

Michael Robinson with the Center for Biological Diversity, one of the groups that sued to restore protections, said a Supreme Court appeal was possible but no decision had been made.

“We’re very disappointed and very saddened,” Robinson said. “Hundreds of wolves have been hunted and trapped and snared, and they are essential to their ecosystem.”

He called the congressional budget bill rider that lifted protections “undemocratic” and said that it set a precedent for future political meddling with imperiled wildlife.

Reposted from Huffington Press 

Yellowstone Wolves Help Trees Rebound

2 Jan

 

by Matthew Brown

Gray Wolf

BILLINGS,Mont. — Scientists say in a new study that the return of gray wolves has dramatically altered the landscape in portions of Yellowstone National Park by curbing foraging elk herds that prevented new aspen, willow and cottonwood trees from taking root.

Study author William Ripple from Oregon State University said tree stands are expanding in areas where for decades dense elk populations prevented new growth.

Wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone in 1995 and 1996 after being killed off early last century. About 100 now roam the park, and elk numbers have dropped sharply. As fewer elk allows the trees to rebound, Ripple says they are providing new habitat for songbirds and more food for beavers.The findings from Ripple and co-author Robert Beschta will be published in the scientific journal Biological Conservation.

Reposted from Associated Press

May the New Year be Wilder

31 Dec

…with more wolves, bears, birds, forests. More crumbling industrial economies and displaced corporations. More connection to the landbase. More attacks on the destroyers of the Earth. More burning banks and bulldozers. More freedom of movement across nationalist boundaries. More wild spirit.

Speaking of wild, check out this New Year’s performance by eco-anarchists from a Lake Worth dance troupe…“Isn’t this awesome?!”

State Wolf-hunting Season Extended

9 Dec

Gray Wolf Pup

By Eve Byron

The season was supposed to end on Dec. 31. But since only 106 wolves out of a quota of 220 have been taken to date, the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks Commission decided Thursday to extend the season.

“This is just the second time we have had a wolf hunt … and we are still learning as we go,” said Bob Ream, FWP Commission chairman, who added while the quota might not be reached this year, it doesn’t mean the hunt wasn’t a success. “There will be more harvest in the next few months, and we’ll see how we are doing when we meet again in January. We may want to make some changes then.

“It seems to be going well, and I think we have come a long way.” 

FWP is managing wolves in Montana after their removal from the list of endangered species earlier this year. The wolf hunt is one of the tools used to keep populations in check. Scientific modeling by FWP anticipated reaching the quota would drop the known wolf population of 566 anywhere from 7 to 25 percent.

The majority of those who spoke on the proposal at the FWP Commission’s monthly meeting supported the season extension, and some added that they would like to see open hunting until the quota is filled to better protect ungulates and livestock.

“People who are not in favor have nothing to lose. It’s not affecting their pocketbook,” said Brian Quigley with the Rocky Mountain Stockgrowers Association. “It is affecting a lot of us in the livestock industry.”

Steve Holt of Dillon added that in his area, the elk herd is at 25 percent of the 15-year average. The quota there for Wolf Management Unit 250 is 22, but only three have been taken.

“I think it’s a lot more complicated, trying to get those wolves,” Holt said. “I support anything we can do to get those wolves.”

But Marc Cooke, co-president of the National Wolfwatcher Coalition, said his group is “adamantly opposed” to the season extension.

“There’s a study going on in the Bitterroot; let it conclude,” Cooke said. “And if people aren’t getting wolves when the weather is convenient, how will they get them when there’s 5 or 6 feet of snow in the backcountry?”

Quentin Kujala, the FWP wildlife management section chief, noted that officials originally considered extending the season until Jan. 31, but based on the low harvest numbers, the department decided to recommend adding two more weeks. He said that since the proposal initially was made public, they’ve received about 100 comments, and as with other wolf proposals, the perspectives were “quite diverse.”

He added that as they looked further into the proposal, FWP also proposed — and the commission supported — not mandating hunters to wear bright orange vests as they have to during the regular big game season.

“We have flexibility in relaxing that since wolf hunters would be hunting a species in need of management,” Kujala said.

Commissioner Shane Colton said he’s heard some criticism that they’re not allowing other methods of take, such as trapping, and letting people use mechanical calls to bring in wolves.

“It’s not appropriate to come running in with other methods at this point,” Colton said. “We’re not allowed to operate in that manner.

“But we are listening to all you folks and we are spending a lot of time trying to figure out what to do here, and I believe we are being pretty proactive when it comes to this animal.”

Reposted from Eve Byron Independent Record